Smartphones are like palm-sized computers, and they deserve the same
protection as desktops and laptops. While you don’t need to install
bulky security software to protect against cyberthreats, there are steps
you can take to keep cybercriminals at bay.

Mobile malware MO

Mobile
malware can be as harmful to a business’s network as infected desktops
and laptops. Potential problems include overcharges on phone bills,
stolen data, intercepting messages, tricking users with phishing
attacks, and sending fake notifications to one’s contact list.

Most
malware comes from applications downloaded from third-party app stores
and give hackers access to passwords, user account information, and
other sensitive personal data. Since many business users link their
Android devices to each other, malware could transfer from one device to
the next.

Who is responsible?

The burden
doesn’t fall solely on smartphone users. App stores such as Google Play
Store are responsible, too, such as in the case of the malware-ridden
banking and weather apps that were downloaded from the Google Play
Store. In these cases, the companies that were affected were urged to
provide updates regarding the malicious apps so they could be removed
from the store.

How to avoid being victimized by malware

The
Google Play Store isn’t 100% secure, but downloading from established
app stores — and not from little-known and less secure ones — reduces
the probability of downloading malicious apps. In cases when an infected
app makes its way to the store and starts getting lots of downloads,
Google will be quick to remove it from the store and make everyone aware
of it.

Despite app stores’ best efforts, it’s nearly impossible
to prevent mobile malware from getting through to the store. That’s why
it pays to read user reviews where infected users post detailed
warnings. Also, regularly updating your mobile device’s operating system
and security software helps prevent infection as the latest versions of
those are patched against the latest known threats in app stores and
elsewhere online.

Malware doesn’t discriminate, so regardless of
your computer or mobile device of choice, it will find a way to infect
you if your software isn’t up to date. To find out whether your business
devices are safe and fully protected, consult our cybersecurity experts
today.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if
you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for
your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment.

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

Phishing scams, whereby cybercriminals masquerade as trustworthy entities to fool victims into disclosing private information, have had a recent surge in popularity. This is largely because hackers realize the best way to infiltrate a system is by exploiting people’s trust. Although these attacks bypass network security systems, there are some tools you can use to defend against them. One is Google’s new anti-phishing feature for Gmail apps on Android devices.

Phishing warnings
The new Gmail app feature uses Google’s Safe Browsing technology to examine billions of URL links per day and identify websites impersonating legitimate ones, like an online store, bank, or social media. It will then check whether these websites are embedded with malware or have elements of a phishing attack (e.g., asking for login credentials, private information, etc.).

If it has reasonable evidence to think that the website is indeed malicious, Gmail will display a warning prompt: “The site you are trying to visit has been identified as a forgery, intended to trick you into disclosing financial, personal, or other sensitive information.”

Keep in mind that Gmail may come up with false positives, and for this reason, Google does not completely block access to using a link but advises that you take extra caution if you choose to proceed.

The tech giant also reported this update is available only for Android users and will eventually reach other devices; so if you have an iOS, be extremely careful when interacting with any links in your Gmail accounts.

Safety for Gmail and Google Docs
In other news, a widespread phishing attack affected thousands of Gmail and Google Doc users earlier this month. The attack uses a spoofed email from a known contact attempting to share a ‘document.’ If opened, the fraudulent link redirects victims into an innocent-looking Google page that asks for account permissions. If users grant access, a worm collects your contact list and proceeds to attack other users. Fortunately, Google quickly responded to the scam, removed the fake pages, and updated anti-phishing detection to account for similar threats.

Security training
While Safe Browsing features are extremely helpful for Android Gmail users, they shouldn’t be a total substitute for good security awareness. Remember, phishing exploits human trust, so make sure to train your employees to have a healthy skepticism of every unsolicited link or file and download security updates whenever possible.

For more information and advice on security training or Android-related news, give us a call today. We’ll make sure your business is completely up to date with shifting mobile security trends and issues.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

If you are seeking out a way to improve your business’s cyber security, both for your business itself as well as for your customers, you are likely looking at your authentication process. Two-step and two-factor authentication are two of the most commonly used options in cyber security. And in current cyber security, many businesses use the terms two-step and two-factor authentication interchangeably.

There are, however, subtle differences between the two. A two-step authentication process requires a single-factor login (such as a memorized password or biometric reading) as well as another of the same type of login that is essentially sent to the user. For example, you may have a memorized password for your first step and then receive a one-time-use code on your cell phone as the second step.

Two-step authentication does function to add an extra step in the authentication process, making it more secure than a single-step authentication (i.e. just the password). However, if a person or business is hacked, it will do only a little to stop hackers from getting a hold of whatever they are looking for.

On the other hand, there is two-factor authentication (sometimes referred to as multi-factor authentication), which is significantly more secure. This type of authentication requires two different types of information to authenticate. For example, it could be a combination of a fingerprint or retinal scan as well as a password or passcode. Because the types of information are different, it would require a hacker a great deal more effort to obtain both forms of authentication.

In essence, every two-factor authentication is a two-step authentication process, but the opposite is not true. With this information in mind, you can be certain that you are using the right type of authentication in your business to keep your business and customer information as secure as possible.

Your network needs the best security technology has to offer. What type of authentication that results in is just one of hundreds of choices that must be made to achieve that end. To take the stress out of securing and protecting your network, call us today for all the help you could ever ask for.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment.

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory. SOURCE

Taking work home, or practically anywhere else, has never been easier. With personal mobile devices, your employees can access company files wherever they are. Bringing your own device (BYOD) has become a popular strategy for many businesses to conduct work more efficiently and flexibly. But this strategy is not without its problems. BYOD, if not implemented correctly, can make your system susceptible to a number of risks. So what security risks do you have to account for? Here are 4 Security risks to consider with BYOD.

Data leakage

The biggest reason why businesses are weary of implementing a BYOD strategy is because it can potentially leave the company’s system vulnerable to data breaches. Personal devices are not part of your business’s IT infrastructure, which means that these devices are not protected by company firewalls and systems. There is also a chance that an employee will take work with them, where they are not using the same encrypted servers that your company is using, leaving your system vulnerable to inherent security risks.

Lost devices

Another risk your company has to deal with, is the possibility of your employees losing their personal devices. When devices with sensitive business information are lost, there is a chance that this could end up falling into the wrong hands. Additionally, if an employee forgets to use a four digit PIN code to lock their smartphone or tablet, anyone can gain unauthorized access to valuable company data stored on that particular device. Therefore, your company should consider countermeasures for lost devices like completely wiping the device of information as soon as an employee reports a missing or stolen phone.

Hackers can infiltrate your system

Personal devices tend to lack adequate data encryption to keep people from snooping. This along with the fact that your employees might not have updated their devices can allow hackers to infiltrate your IT infrastructure.

Connecting to open Wifi spots makes your company more susceptible to hackers. Open wireless points in public places can put device owners at risk because there is a chance that hackers may have created that hotspot to trick people into connecting. Once the device owner has connected, attackers can simply surveil web activity and gain access to your company’s accounts.

Vulnerable to malware

Viruses are also a big problem when implementing BYOD strategies into your business. Using personal devices means your employees can access whatever sites or download any mobile apps that your business would normally restrict to protect your system.

Jailbreaking or rooting a device also puts your systems at risk because it removes limitations imposed by the manufacturer to keep the mobile software updated and protected against external threats. It’s best to understand that as your employees have the freedom to choose whatever device they want to work with, the process of keeping track of vulnerabilities and updates is considerably harder. So if you’re thinking about implementing BYOD strategies to your business, prepare your IT department for an array of potential malware attacks on different devices.

So you might be thinking that it would probably be best to just avoid implementing a BYOD strategy in the first place. However, BYOD will help your business grow and adapt to the modern workplace, and should not be dismissed as a legitimate IT solution. It’s just important to educate your company about these risks so that problems won’t occur for your business down the line.

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory SOURCE

Every time a stolen laptop leads to a data breach, you wonder why the business involved hadn’t set up any safeguards. When the unencrypted laptop was stolen from a former physician at the University of Oklahoma, for instance, or when a laptop was stolen from insurance provider Oregon Health Co-op containing data on 15,000 members.

You’d think money would motivate them, if nothing else. In November, EMC and Hartford Hospital were ordered to pay US$90,000 to the state of Connecticut over the theft of an unencrypted laptop in 2012 containing data on nearly 9,000 people. The laptop was stolen from an EMC employee’s home.

The problem extends far beyond the healthcare industry, too—such as the laptop stolen from SterlingBackCheck, a New York-based background screening service. The laptop contained data on 100,000 people.

These types of breaches don’t quite grab the same headlines as major cybercrimes and hacking incidents, if only because a thousand employees affected by a laptop theft is less dramatic than 40 million customers at Target. But it’s a lot easier to steal a laptop than it is to hack into a corporate database, so the theft and loss of laptops, as well as desktops and flash drives, highlight the need for enhanced physical security and employee training.

It’s easier to steal a laptop than to hack a database

The organizations mentioned here have wised up. A spokesperson for the University of Oklahoma said it has launched an encryption program and new training for employees when it comes to handling sensitive data.

SterlingBackCheck said it has updated its encryption and audit procedures, revised its equipment custody protocols, retrained employees on privacy and data security, and installed remote-wipe software on portable devices.

Another threat to your data is the proliferation of Bring You Own Device (BYOD) policies and mobile workers.Gartner anticipates that half of all companies will have some need for a BYOD policy by 2017. Workers will be using their own devices as well as company-issued ones in the office or on the go. This opens up a new risk if devices are lost or stolen.

Security firms like Sophos urge companies to put a robust policy in place for the handling of professional devices, including full disk encryption as well as encrypted cloud and removable media. A strong password is highly recommended too, but it’s not enough on its own.

A greater sense of urgency wouldn’t hurt, either. In Oklahoma, the physician had actually left his position at the university before his personal laptop went missing. He couldn’t say for sure whether it contained sensitive data, but by the time that possibility arose, it was too late.

In another incident, at manufacturer Tremco, an employee lost a company-issued laptop on a plane. It was several weeks before the employee realized that it contained spreadsheets of personal employee data.

Encryption, remote wiping, better data tracking

Companies need to know where their data is at all times—not just what device it is on, but where that device is located physically.

This highlights the need for remote wiping tools, which SterlingBackCheck has put in place. If a laptop is lost or stolen, the company should have an easy way to remotely wipe the sensitive data to ensure it never leaks.

Much like large-scale hacking attacks, it’s the consumer or the patient that really suffers when a data breach occurs. The onus lies with the company to handle this data responsibly, whether it’s in the cloud or on a laptop on the bus.

Published with consideration from PCWorld. SOURCE

Cloud computing is here to stay, and the buzz throughout industry and government is that hybrid clouds will become the new norm going forward. Hybrid clouds, according to industry experts, can offer the security of on premise, private clouds and the flexibility and agility of commercial public clouds. The Gartner research firm predicts almost half of all large, global enterprises will have deployed hybrid clouds by the end of 2017, with 2016 being a defining year where they will start to move away from private into hybrids.

As inevitable as the cloud is to most organisations, this migration could challenge the management of identity and access privileges of users on your networks and IT systems. There are a few things to keep in mind as your company decides to push forward into a hybrid cloud and the necessary unified management framework that doing so will require.

The virtues of virtual private networks

Virtualization is a means of positioning computing resources (e.g. servers, operating systems, storage, networks) so they may maximise the use of physical computing resources across multiple users. It’s a huge step in the journey toward the hybrid cloud. Thankfully, over the past few years, virtualization technology has expanded from simply running virtual machines on supercomputers to offering all levels and types of virtualized services and networks.

Moreover, virtualization allows a single physical server to run multiple guest operating systems as a way of making more efficient use of the hardware. The technology allows organisations to free up data center space and achieve greater IT operational and energy efficiencies.

In fact, many organisations have been engaged in server virtualization projects for a number of years and are moving on to client, desktop and storage virtualization projects. Part of the formula for success is evaluating capacity planning and other infrastructure assessment tools that can give IT managers a sense of their resource utilisation and help them decide which applications to virtualize.

But like most powerful tools, this is a double-edged sword. Remote access to online resources can effectively negate perimeter defenses and extend the domain of the insider threat worldwide.

Systems need to be able to authenticate the identity of users, and in some cases also the devices being used for access together with the location and type of networks or resources being used. Only then can access privileges be securely granted, based not only on identity, but also the user’s role in the organisation and the circumstances of the connection. An employee connecting to a system during business hours over a secure network might be given wider privileges than when connecting from the other side of the world in the middle of the night, for instance. Hypersocket Software is introducing a suite of access management tools that provide a common user experience and enable organisations to enforce least privilege policies for remote users.

The Hypersocket VPN provides a cost effective alternative to IPsec or Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol for secure browser-based remote access with the ease of use of SSL. It lends itself well to Bring Your Own Device scenarios, because the client has no direct access to the network. The ability to have connections to multiple sites at the same time enables secure access to a corporate LAN and other resources such as a private cloud without the need for a permanent bridge between them.

The VPN comes in two editions, a free Open Source version that provides basic connectivity under the GNU General Public License v3 and an Enterprise Edition that provides the additional features required by security-conscious organisations. The server can be installed on any operating system supporting Java and client support currently is available for Windows and Apple OS X.

To enable access, the administrator defines one or more Network Resources using the HSF resource architecture, which identifies individual TCP/IP services that can be assigned to users through their roles.

The Enterprise Edition adds further support, including support for users logging in from Active Directory, branding, auditing, accessing file systems over WebDAV and extended file system support such as Amazon S3, SFTP. It allows for configurable authentication flows and new authentication mechanisms. An Audit Log records all events, which are searchable by event type, session or user. Reports can be exported as CSV, XML or PDF, and administrators have full control over how long the server keeps the data before it is archived.

Published with consideration from ITProPortal. SOURCE

As part of the worldwide rollout of the new Apps, Microsoft announced Office Mobile released for Windows 10. Tablet users with Windows 10 can enjoy free access to the mobile versions of Microsoft’s popular Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote applications. The mobile version of these applications is designed with a “touch-first’ interface to improve functionality for tablet users while providing all the Office features you would find on your desktop computer.

One of the biggest complaints about trying to edit a Microsoft Office file from a tablet is usability or lack thereof. That has all changed, at least for Windows 10 users, with Microsoft’s recent release of Office Mobile apps. The tablet-friendly versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote have been built from the ground up to improve touch functionality.
Even if you don’t have Windows 10, you still might be intrigued about the potential of having Office apps that are touch-friendly. Here are some of the new features you can enjoy when using Office Mobile apps.

Word

Microsoft Word Mobile has all the tools and features of the PC version including more nuanced tasks like being able to track changes and add footnotes. The Read mode, a mobile exclusive, improves the way documents appear by making them flow better on the smaller screens of a tablet while also letting you zoom in and out with a simple tap of the screen.

Excel

Recommended Charts is the prominent feature of the Excel Mobile app. It allows you to quickly show off your data using a stylish chart or graph with only a few taps. You will also find that reordering columns, adding formulae, changing chart types and the majority of Excel’s other core functions are easier than ever before.

PowerPoint

Of course Office wouldn’t be Office without PowerPoint. The mobile version of the app allows you to edit slides with new touch gestures. This makes it easy to insert and edit pictures, tables, shapes and SmartArt. But the real star here, and of the entire Office Mobile setup, is the Presenter View. This mode gives you full control over what your audience sees on the big screen during a presentation while still letting you view your speaker notes on the tablet.

OneNote

Windows 10 comes installed with OneNote, so you’re probably already using it. Tablet users will notice that changes made by anyone working in the notebook are automatically saved and synchronized for everyone to see.

The release of Office Mobile apps is just one of three big launches to come from Microsoft in 2015. Both Microsoft Office 2016 and Office Mobile for phones are slated for release this fall. Yet, while these tablet applications represent marked improvements for Windows 10 tablet users, they are probably not quite enough to warrant the switch from other operating systems just yet. In fact, even if you’re in love with the idea of having user-friendly, mobile versions of Office, you might want to hang on in there – it’s likely Microsoft will release them for iOS and Android in the near future, too.
Want to know what hardware and software is best for your company? Want to increase productivity in your office? Get in touch with us and we’ll show you how to do it.

We’ve been programmed to think the newest or latest version of something is a “must have” but in the case of Windows 8, there is a lot to consider.

Former Microsoft Windows Division President Steven Sinofsky described Windows 8 as “a generational change” the likes of which hasn’t been made since Windows 95. And indeed, the majority of the information found on the Web concerning Windows 8 is how brilliant it is on mobile devices. However, the praise ends there and the critics raise their heads when the conversation turns to Windows 8 on desktops and laptops. 

Pros and Cons

As with anything, there is good and bad.  It’s a completely capable OS and should not be totally dismissed but it’s worth weighing some of the pros and cons.

Pros:

  • Runs on desktops, laptops, tablets, and mobile phones
  • Faster start up. Also performs quicker when run through several benchmark performance tests than either Windows 7 (or Apple’s Mountain Lion).
  • Battery life has significantly improved on laptops and tablets.
  • Features like File History, Storage Space and improved Internet Explorer (although all of these are available in previous versions of Windows).
  • New feature SecureBoot, which has the potential to reduce viruses and other malware for some users.
  • Access to apps and upgrades available through the new Windows Store

Cons:

  • Mobile-centric design which wastes screen “real estate” on desktops/laptops.
  • Involves a steep learning curve.
  • No systems tray; the Start button/menu has disappeared, as well as the Programs menu (although Microsoft has some changes planned in Windows 8.1 due out shortly).
  • Interface is clumsy and wildly unpopular.

The online IT magazine TechRepulic conducted a poll of its membership of IT professionals in October 2012 in which 72.9% of respondents (over 1200 respondents in total) stated their organizations have no plans to deploy Windows 8 in the near future, 23.8% reporting that they will skip the OS altogether. 61.2% of the respondents who do plan to deploy Windows 8 indicated tablet/mobile integration was a major factor in doing so.

So how do you know what to do?

When all the tech blogs are crammed with people’s opinions, rather than straight facts, it’s sometimes hard to know if you should take the plunge or not.  We are of the opinion that if your organization is looking to make a big move towards mobile or touchscreen devices, then Windows 8 may be a good way to go.  Undeniably, Windows 8 shines most on a touchscreen system.

If it’s business as usual in your office then there is no good reason to upgrade at this point given the level of disruption and subsequent training it would entail.  However, take note that change is coming and Windows 8 is a glimpse into the future.

What if you need a new computer?

Currently there are still new computers on the market that use the Windows 7 operating systems, particularly through resellers such as CDW.com. Additionally, you can still buy the Windows 7 software to upgrade from Windows XP and some Windows 8 licenses can be downgraded to Windows 7.  But we suspect time is running out, so make a decision quickly.

Manufacturers of computers will soon be forcing you to pick Windows 8 if you want an OS.  When this happens, there are a few options available so don’t feel trapped. For instance, Dell offers computers with no OS without the cost of a Windows OS license.  Some Windows 7 keys are transferable to a new computer, assuming you remove the key/OS from the old computer.  You will have to install the OS yourself and call Microsoft to transfer the key, but it’s a perfectly reasonable way to continue using Windows 7 and save some money (be aware – this will depend on who manufactured both the old and the new machines).

Whether you decide to upgrade or stick with what you have, GCInfotech can walk you through the process and ensure your business has the least amount of disruption.

 

Its not just a trend.

Thanks to Marissa Mayer’s new policy at Yahoo and Sheryl Sandburg’s recent leadership manifesto Lean In, there’s a great debate going on at the moment about company employees working from home instead of the office and women in the workplace standing up for themselves in order to advance their careers.  At first the two debates seem to fall on different sides of the fence, but at the root of it is how technology has allowed companies to build a workforce that does not necessarily need to show up to the office in order to be effective in their jobs.  And this therefore gives greater flexibility to women (and men) trying to juggle advancing their career, taking care of their family and personal happiness.

Maybe a Hybrid Solution is the Best Solution.

Sandburg’s personal success cannot be disputed, but if employees lean in, only to keel over on to the boardroom table out of fatigue, something is wrong. Managers ought to create the conditions to get the best work from all staff, not simply to extract the most work from a determined few. As software entrepreneur Prerna Gupta said in NYTimes.com, most digital-age jobs require both creative collaboration and “unstructured time to think” implying a hybrid solution might be the best solution.

While Mayer’s blanket policy requiring all remote workers to show up at the office may contradict this notion, we should recognize that she’s a new leader of a company in need of drastic change.  It does not mean that working remotely isn’t effective, it just shines a light on the fact that it needs to be managed. Going mobile is reported to have increased employee productivity by 20% and there is no question it provides greater flexibility to manage a family life. Companies today are finding this flexibility is key to being able to quickly and efficiently service clients.

Be sure to consider your I.T. infrastructure.

Going mobile can certainly be more cost effective than ever with the right initial set up. This kind of change doesn’t happen overnight though and its definitely not a matter of just letting your employees work from home when they want.  At the core, you need a solid technology network that can support a mobile workforce, which should not be taken lightly.

With regards to your technology, consider the following:

  • Make sure your infrastructure can support a mobile workforce and you have a suitable VPN setup and licensing strategy.
  • Ensure your IT policies cover employee-owned equipment (either allow it with restrictions, or do not allow it), and enforce security, such as anti-virus software and firewalls.
  • Employ a workforce management tool to help coordinate business objectives and goal setting, and to manage employee relationships along the chain of command
  • Institute security measures from the company’s perspective, not the employee’s — limit employees to ‘need-to-know’ access to sensitive company data.
  • Ensure your IT policies address the dependence of home internet availability and speed.
  • Implement an organizational control structure to manage the issues experienced by a mobile workforce. For instance, what happens if one of your employees loses his/her smartphone? What company data was on it and how secure was that data? Can you remote wipe the device? Was data backed up and can you still access it?

Supporting a more mobile workforce can have a tremendously positive effect on your company’s bottom line, but there are real and pressing factors to consider when it comes to preparing your company for this kind of change.

Case Study

For years GCInfotech has employed a mixture of full-time and part-time employees, some who are in the office every day, all day, and some who only come in when needed.  Our latest addition, Ginny Wills, was brought in to lead the website development and online marketing efforts for the company. But it was only through providing her the flexibility that she needed to look after her small children that we were able to entice her to join us.  She works from home some days and in the office some days, depending on what’s going on, and now both GCInfotech and its clients benefit from her over 20 years of experience. She’s happier for it and our clients are better off because of it.

GCInfotech has experience in helping companies lay the foundation for these changes so let us know when you are ready to take the plunge. With the proper controls in place, the only way to go is up. Give us a call at 888.323.3066.

GCInfotech is your total business IT solutions resource for Cloud Computing

Everybody’s talking about “the cloud.” But what does it all mean?

Cloud computing is nothing new. But boy does everyone love a new and exciting buzzword. The key, really, is knowing if sending your data into the cloud is a sound business decision for you. GCInfotech can help you avoid the pitfalls and find the clearest path to the cloud, while weighing the risk vs. reward and the value vs. cost of moving your vital business processes into a cloud-based, hosted environment.

So, what is the cloud anyway? It’s really nothing more than third party management of your data, allowing for easy access from any portal or device that’s connected to the internet. Sounds simple enough, but this in and of itself doesn’t necessarily mean you should make the leap into a cloud-based system.

Ask yourself a few questions first:

Do you have a good way to protect and back up your data regardless of where and when you access it?

Do you have sufficient bandwidth to access the cloud efficiently?

Are your emails kept confidential?

Will the cloud provider stick around if you have a financial meltdown?

Do you have ballooning technical infrastructure costs that you’d like to address?

What are the benefits?

1. Reduced space. Physical hardware can take up a lot of space. Take for example your servers. If you virtualize these, you can probably fit all of them onto one or two units. This will reduce the space your hardware takes up, freeing up extra storage capacity or possibly another desk.

2. Reduced overhead. Having hardware and servers in an office can be expensive to maintain. Cloud computing will often reduce overhead costs and save you money.

3. Quicker backup and recovery.  This means that your vital data is always backed up and protected. Beyond that, the backups ‘are in the cloud’, meaning that if there is a disaster, you can recover lost data quickly and easily.

4. Longer hardware replacement cycles. Virtualized solutions and platforms often require lower computing resources because they are hosted on the provider’s servers. This means that you won’t have to replace existing tech hardware.

5. The cloud is scalable. If your company is growing, you will eventually have to add new systems. In an already cramped office this means finding the space for hardware or servers needed to support your growth, not to mention investing in systems that are compatible with existing hardware. Virtualization is highly scalable, and can grow with your company, often without the need for extra services.

We assure you, the cloud is nothing new and nothing to feel overwhelmed about, but there are indeed a variety of links in the chain of services that can often lead to a cloud-based solution that’s just plain cloudy.

Let GCInfotech help  you clear the fog and find a solution that makes sense for you and your business.