Phishing might sound complicated, but the basic concept is simple: deception. Criminals try to trick you into revealing personal information or clicking on dangerous links. This blog will equip you with the knowledge to recognize phishing attempts and leverage Microsoft 365 Defender’s advanced protection to stay safe online.

The rising tide of phishing attacks

Phishing attacks have evolved far beyond questionable emails from foreign princes. Today, they are meticulously crafted to mimic legitimate communications from trusted entities, making them all the more dangerous. For small businesses, especially, the stakes are incredibly high. With limited resources and often less stringent cybersecurity measures, they are particularly vulnerable targets. The consequences of falling prey to these attacks can be devastating, ranging from financial ruin to irreversible reputational damage.

Unveiling the shield: Microsoft 365 Defender

Recognizing the critical need for advanced protection, Microsoft has engineered the 365 Defender suite, a comprehensive security solution tailored to thwart the attempts of even the most devious cybercriminals. Here’s how its key features stand guard at the gates of your digital domain:

Anti-malware

At the frontline of defense, Microsoft 365 Defender’s anti-malware layer scrutinizes incoming emails for malicious content. Leveraging state-of-the-art algorithms and vast threat intelligence databases, it ensures that harmful attachments and links are neutralized before they can inflict damage.

Anti-spam

An unsung hero in the battle against phishing, the anti-spam component efficiently filters out unsolicited emails, significantly reducing the clutter in inboxes and minimizing the odds of employees encountering deceitful messages.

Sandbox

Some threats are too sophisticated for conventional detection methods, and that’s why Microsoft 365 Defender employs a sandboxing technique. Suspicious attachments are isolated and executed in a secure, virtual environment, away from critical systems, to assess their behavior without risk.

Safe Links

In a clever twist on real-time protection, Safe Links technology scrutinizes URLs at the moment of click, steering users away from harmful sites. This proactive approach is invaluable in defending against the increasingly common tactic of using short-lived, malicious websites in phishing campaigns.

Fortifying your business’s cyber defenses

The menace of phishing cannot be underestimated, nor can it be ignored. Microsoft 365 Defender emerges not just as a shield but as a vital ally for small businesses determined to safeguard their digital frontiers. By integrating this robust suite into your cybersecurity strategy, you can significantly mitigate the risk of phishing attacks and focus on what matters most: growing your business.

Get in touch with one of our experts today and ensure that your business stands resilient in the face of cyberthreats.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

Disasters come in various forms, from malicious cyberattacks to unexpected system failures to natural calamities. With these threats becoming increasingly common, businesses must navigate through a maze of myths and misconceptions surrounding disaster recovery. Here are the top six disaster recovery myths you should be aware of.

Myth 1: Disaster recovery is only necessary for large corporations

News outlets often report on major disruptions and disasters that impact big corporations because they make for great headlines. After all, corporations that are typically presumed to have several safeguards falling victim to disasters is a gripping story.

However, this has led to the misconception that only large corporations need disaster recovery plans. Cyberattacks, technical issues, and natural disasters affect businesses of all sizes, and no organization is immune to the potential damages. Whether it’s a small business with limited resources or a large corporation with an extensive IT infrastructure, having a disaster recovery plan in place is essential for keeping operations running smoothly.

Myth 2: Data backups are all you need for disaster recovery

Despite being a crucial component of disaster recovery, data backups are not sufficient on their own. A comprehensive disaster recovery plan encompasses backup solutions along with other critical elements such as disaster response protocols, alternate infrastructure options, and communication strategies. Companies with mission-critical systems may even need to set up a secondary worksite to ensure business continuity in the event of a disaster. Without a well-rounded plan in place, businesses risk losing valuable time and resources trying to piece together a recovery strategy in the midst of a disaster.

Myth 3: Disaster recovery is expensive and complex

While implementing a robust disaster recovery plan requires investment, it is not inherently prohibitively expensive or overly complex. Cloud-based data backups and disaster recovery solutions from managed IT services providers have made it more affordable and manageable for businesses of all sizes to have a comprehensive disaster recovery plan in place. Plus, the cost of a disaster recovery plan is significantly lower than the potential losses a business could face in the event of a disaster.

Myth 4: Only IT departments are responsible for disaster recovery

Disaster recovery planning should involve the entire organization, not just the IT department. While the IT team plays a critical role in implementing and maintaining disaster recovery solutions, it is essential for all employees to understand their responsibilities in case of a disaster. Business continuity planning should involve cross-departmental collaboration, awareness training for employees, and clear communication protocols during emergencies.

Myth 5: Achieving zero downtime and data loss is always feasible for disaster recovery

Although zero downtime and zero data loss are ideal scenarios for disaster recovery, they may not always be practical or achievable for every business. The cost and complexity of implementing such high levels of resilience can be prohibitive for many organizations.

Instead, businesses should establish realistic recovery objectives based on their specific needs and prioritize the most critical systems and data for recovery. Less critical systems and data may have a longer recovery timeframe, but as long as the most vital functions are restored quickly, the business can continue to operate.

Myth 6: Disaster recovery planning is a one-time task

Disaster recovery planning isn’t something that can be checked off a to-do list and forgotten about. Business environments evolve, new threats emerge, and technology advances, making it crucial to revisit and revise the recovery plan periodically. Conducting regular assessments, testing procedures, and incorporating lessons learned from simulations or real incidents are essential for maintaining an effective disaster recovery strategy.

If you want a truly effective disaster recovery plan that’s not based on myths and misconceptions but rather on hard data, contact us today. We provide comprehensive disaster recovery planning and solutions that can help your business mitigate risks, reduce downtime, and ensure minimal loss in case of a disaster.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

For many of today’s website operators, boosting conversion rates is one of the primary goals. Transforming casual visitors into loyal customers is, after all, the ultimate aim of maintaining an online presence. To facilitate this crucial mission, we present these five practical tips you can immediately implement to boost your site’s conversion rate.

Keep it simple

Emphasizing simplicity is crucial in web design. Unnecessary elements can be confusing and time-consuming for users to navigate. Each page, word, and image on a company website should actively contribute to the goal of prompting visitors to contact you, so steer clear of excess information, irrelevant games, and distracting animations. Opt instead for a clean layout that enables visitors to immediately understand what you’re offering and how they can connect with you with a single click.

Mobile matters: Prioritize the phone view

Your website needs to work flawlessly on smartphones. That’s where many people are browsing, and if your site gives them trouble, they’ll bounce faster than a rogue email.

Mobile-first design tackles this head-on. It means building your website with mobile users in mind first, then expanding it for larger screens. Think responsive layouts that automatically adjust, buttons designed for thumbs, and easy navigation — not just on the home page, but everywhere. You can think of it as being similar to a map: every corner should be reachable without users getting lost.

Enhance your site with engaging photos

They say a picture speaks a thousand words, and in website design, this rings particularly true. The right image can instantly capture visitors’ attention, making your site more memorable.

When choosing photos for your website, opt for high-quality, relevant images. Avoid using generic stock photos whenever possible. Instead, showcase your team and offerings with original images. With original photos, you have control over the message they convey, helping you stand out from the competition.

Consistency is key to connecting with your audience. Use a specific photographic or graphic style that your audience can easily identify. This not only contributes to your brand’s trustworthiness but also makes it more relatable.

Improve social media icon placement

Adding social media icons can boost your business’s credibility, but it comes with a caveat. Placing these icons at the top of a page may tempt visitors to click away, leading them to get sidetracked on social media. Remember, the main goal is to keep visitors on your website, exploring what you have to offer.

To achieve this, consider relocating the social media icons to the bottom of the page or in the footer area. This move ensures that visitors engage with your services and content first before venturing into the social media sphere.

Make it easy to connect — don’t hide your contact info

Need help from your website visitors? Don’t bury your contact details. Put your phone number, email address, or even live chat options front and center. Make it easy for site visitors to reach you, whether they’re just curious or ready to buy.

This is especially helpful for people who might not want to leave their email on a form. Give them a direct way to connect, and you’ll open the door to more conversations and conversions.
Turning your website into a conversion machine doesn’t require fancy tricks. By focusing on the basics — clear information, easy navigation, and simplicity — you make it easy for potential customers to get in touch.

Boosting conversions on your website is all about the basics. Follow these tips, focus on key website elements such as clear info and easy navigation, and you’ll create a space that both looks good and turns visitors into customers. If you need more website tips and/or other assistance with anything IT-related, contact us today.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

It’s no secret that cybersecurity has become a necessity for small businesses. As the threat landscape continues to evolve, grasping the fundamentals of cybersecurity is not only crucial for safeguarding your operations, but also for keeping your business from becoming a gateway to more widespread attacks. Knowledge is the key, and with the right cybersecurity training, you can arm yourself with the necessary tools to protect your business from cyberthreats.

In this comprehensive guide, we will walk through the most critical cybersecurity training topics small-business owners like you need to master. These training areas are not only crucial for protecting your digital footprint but also for meeting compliance standards that may be required in your industry. Let’s dive in and learn how you can protect your business from digital threats.

Passwords: The first line of defense

Passwords are often the first line of defense against cyberattacks. However, many small-business owners underestimate the importance of creating robust passwords for their accounts. It is crucial to educate yourself and your employees about password best practices, such as:

Creating strong and unique passwords
Passwords should be complex, using a combination of upper- and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters. Avoid using easy-to-guess information, such as birthdays or pet names.

You need a mix of techniques to form a password that is virtually impossible to crack. One such method is creating an acronym for a memorable phrase and substituting numbers or special characters for letters.

Implementing password management tools
With so many online accounts and passwords to remember, it’s easy to fall into the trap of reusing the same password. To prevent this, consider using a password management tool that securely stores all your passwords in one place. These tools generate strong and unique passwords for you and can even automatically log you in to your accounts without you having to type out the password.

Email: A common entry point for cyberattacks

Emails are the heart of business communications, which is why they are also a prime target for cybercriminals. Here are some essential training topics to secure your business’s email communications.

Spotting phishing emails
Phishing emails are fraudulent emails designed to trick you into revealing sensitive information, such as passwords or credit card numbers. They can be challenging to recognize, as they often appear to come from a legitimate source. Train your team to identify common signs of phishing, such as suspicious sender addresses and requests for sensitive information.

You can also conduct simulated phishing training, where you send fake phishing emails to your team to see how they respond. This can be a powerful way to highlight areas for improvement without the risks of an actual attack.

Creating email policies
Establishing email policies is crucial for ensuring secure and professional communication within your company. These policies should cover topics such as proper password protection, encryption of sensitive information, and guidelines for handling suspicious emails.

Social media: A gold mine for identity thieves

Social media is a treasure trove for hackers. It provides them with personal information that can be used for identity theft or targeted attacks. Understanding how to manage your social media accounts and the risks involved is essential for keeping your business safe.

Limiting personal information on public profiles
Encourage your employees to limit the personal information they share on their social media profiles. This includes details such as birthdates, home addresses, and phone numbers. Hackers can use this information to impersonate employees or even steal their identities.
As for your business’s social media accounts, avoid posting sensitive information such as financial details or employee personal information.

Monitoring social media for suspicious activity
Train your employees to keep an eye out for suspicious activity on social media. This could include fake accounts impersonating the company or employees, unusual posts or comments, or links to malicious websites. Reporting these incidents immediately can prevent potential cyberattacks.

Protecting company data: A core business responsibility

Protecting your company’s data is not only essential for cybersecurity but also for maintaining the trust of your clients. Here are some training topics that will help you establish secure data protection practices within your organization.

Data backup and recovery
Regularly backing up important data is crucial in case of a cyberattack or system failure. Ensure your employees understand the importance of backing up their work and how to do it properly. Additionally, having a recovery plan in place can minimize downtime and losses in case of an attack.

Secure file sharing and storage
With remote and hybrid work becoming the norm, secure file sharing and storage practices are more critical than ever. Train your employees on how to use cloud-based services or virtual private networks (VPNs) for secure access to company files. Ensure they understand the risks of using personal devices or unsecured networks.

Physical security
Don’t overlook physical security when it comes to protecting your company’s data. Educate employees on the importance of securing laptops, phones, and other devices that contain sensitive information. Also, establish protocols for securely disposing of old devices to prevent any data breaches.

Encourage a culture of security awareness within your company, stay informed on the latest cybersecurity developments, and always be ready to adapt to new threats. By investing in cybersecurity training, you are not only protecting your business but also contributing to a safer online environment for all.

Contact our team of experts to learn more about developing a comprehensive cybersecurity training program for your business.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

The digital landscape is riddled with threats: malware attacks, phishing scams, and data breaches are just a few. But by taking a proactive approach to cybersecurity, you can significantly reduce your risk and keep your business safe. Here’s a guide to fortifying your online defenses.

Create strong, unique passwords

Passwords are your first line of defense against unauthorized access to your accounts and sensitive information. This is why you should avoid using easily guessable passwords such as “123456” or “password.” Instead, create strong passphrases. A passphrase is a string of four or more random words. This extra length and randomness make them much harder for cybercriminals to crack but still easier for you to remember than a jumbled mess of characters.

For maximum security, use a different passphrase for each of your accounts. This way, if one account gets compromised, your other accounts are still safe.

Tip: Remembering multiple complex passphrases can be a challenge. Consider using a password manager, which stores all your passphrases in one place. This makes your passphrases easily accessible while keeping them safe from prying eyes.

Implement multifactor authentication (MFA)

MFA adds an extra layer of security to your online accounts by requiring additional verification beyond just a password, such as a one-time code sent to your phone or a fingerprint scan. By enabling MFA, even if someone obtains your password, they won’t be able to access your account without fulfilling the additional verification requirements.

Tip: Whenever possible, enable MFA on your important accounts, including email, banking, and cloud services.

Keep software and systems updated

Cybercriminals often exploit weaknesses in outdated software to gain unauthorized access to systems. To stay protected, regularly update your software, operating systems, and applications because these updates often include essential security patches that fix those vulnerabilities.

Tip: Set up automatic updates on all your devices so you don’t have to remember to update manually, and your devices stay continuously protected without any extra effort from you.

Use secure Wi-Fi networks

When accessing the internet, it’s important to use secure Wi-Fi networks. Public Wi-Fi in airports or coffee shops can be targeted by cybercriminals. Instead, use encrypted Wi-Fi connections, which require a password and scramble your data, making it unintelligible even if intercepted.

For an extra layer of security, consider using a virtual private network (VPN). A VPN encrypts all your internet traffic, creating a secure tunnel between your device and the internet, regardless of the Wi-Fi network you’re on.

Tip: Configure your devices to automatically connect only to trusted Wi-Fi networks that you know and use. Additionally, disable the option to connect to open networks to avoid accidental connections to unsecured Wi-Fi.

Conduct security awareness training for employees

Employees are often the weakest link in an organization’s cyber defense, as they may inadvertently fall victim to phishing scams or unknowingly compromise sensitive information. However, regular training sessions can empower your employees to recognize and respond to cyberthreats effectively.

Tip: Simulate phishing attacks to test your employees’ preparedness and reinforce training.

By following these simple yet effective tips, you can significantly enhance the online security posture of your business and minimize the risk of falling victim to cyberthreats. Remember, investing in online security is not just about protecting your data — it’s also about safeguarding the reputation and integrity of your business in an increasingly digital world.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

Between infostealers, ransomware, and BEC attacks, SMBs are having a hard time remaining secure

Information-stealing malware, ransomware, and business email compromise (BEC), remain the three biggest cyber-threats small and medium-sized businesses (SMB) are facing, a new report from Sophos has warned.

The company claims almost half of all malware detected on SMB endpoints last year were either keyloggers, spyware, or infostealers – all malicious programs used to steal sensitive data and login credentials. 

For the researchers, this makes sense as the abuse of legitimate accounts is more difficult to spot, while opening the doors to many more criminal opportunities.

Ransomware and BEC

“The value of ‘data,’ as currency has increased exponentially among cybercriminals, and this is particularly true for SMBs, which tend to use one service or software application, per function, for their entire operation,” says Christpher Budd, director of Sophos X-Ops.

“For example, let’s say attackers deploy an infostealer on their target’s network to steal credentials and then get hold of the password for the company’s accounting software. Attackers could then gain access to the targeted company’s financials and have the ability to funnel funds into their own accounts.” 

Infostealers may be the most wide-spread threats, but ransomware remains the biggest. Fortunately for SMBs, the number of ransomware attacks “stabilized”, Sophos said, suggesting that growth slowed down. At the same time, ransomware attacks continue to evolve. Between 2022 and 2023, the number of remote encryption attacks rose by almost two-thirds (62%). Remote encryption happens when threat actors use an unmanaged device belonging to the victim organization, to encrypt files on other systems.

BEC attacks are the second-highest type of attack, right after ransomware, Sophos concluded. The attackers engaged in BEC are growing increasingly sophisticated, and often engage in a series of conversational emails with their victims, and sometimes even phone calls, before deciding to strike.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechRadar SOURCE

Employee monitoring has become a widely debated topic today. With advancements in technology and the increasing reliance on digital communication and work platforms, many employers are choosing to monitor their employees’ activities. This practice has many benefits, but it’s not without drawbacks. Here, we’ll discuss the pros and cons of online employee monitoring to help you decide if it’s right for your business.

Defining online employee monitoring

Online employee monitoring refers to the practice of tracking and analyzing employees’ digital activities in the workplace. This is often performed using specialized employee monitoring software that is installed on employee devices. The software can track various aspects of employee behavior, such as internet usage, email communication, screen activity, and even keystrokes. By leveraging monitoring tools, employers gain insights into how employees interact with digital resources, enabling them to identify patterns, assess productivity levels, and mitigate security risks.

Benefits of online employee monitoring

The adoption of online employee monitoring offers several tangible benefits for organizations:

  • Enhanced productivity – By gaining visibility into employee workflows and identifying bottlenecks, businesses can optimize processes and improve overall productivity. For example, if employees are spending too much time on non-work-related websites, monitoring can help address the issue and boost efficiency. At the same time, simply knowing that their activities are being monitored can motivate employees to stay on task.
  • Data security – Monitoring digital activities allows employers to detect unsafe online behavior and warn employees who violate security protocols before they fall victim to a cyberthreat. For instance, if an employee often visits malicious websites or downloads unsanctioned applications, employers and system administrators can put a stop to these actions to minimize the risk of a data breach.
  • Compliance management – Employee monitoring can aid in compliance management by ensuring that employees follow industry regulations and internal policies. This is especially important when it comes to industry-specific data policies where employees must handle sensitive information with utmost confidentiality and only share data with authorized parties.

Potential drawbacks of online employee monitoring

While online employee monitoring offers various advantages, it also comes with several drawbacks:

  • Privacy concerns – Monitoring employees’ digital activities can raise significant privacy concerns, potentially eroding trust and morale within the workforce. This is particularly problematic if employees are not aware that their actions are being tracked or if monitoring extends to personal devices.
  • Ethical issues – The use of employee monitoring software raises ethical questions about the balance between employer rights and employee privacy. Employers must consider implementing clear policies on how and when monitoring takes place to avoid violating employee trust.
  • Employee resistance – Excessive monitoring may lead to employee resentment and resistance, undermining morale and negatively impacting retention rates. What’s more, anxiety levels toward performance may increase if employees feel that their every move is under scrutiny.
  • Inaccurate assessments – Monitoring alone does not provide a complete picture of an employee’s performance. Some activities, such as brainstorming or working collaboratively with colleagues, may not show up in monitoring data and could lead to inaccurate productivity assessments.

Finding the right balance

To effectively leverage online employee monitoring while mitigating its potential drawbacks, companies must strive to find the right balance. Here are some strategies to achieve this:

  • Transparency and communication – Foster open communication with employees regarding monitoring practices, clarifying the objectives, scope, and implications of monitoring activities.
  • Purposeful monitoring – Focus monitoring efforts on specific areas or activities relevant to business objectives, avoiding unnecessary intrusion into personal or non-work-related communications.
  • Privacy protections – Implement safeguards to protect employee privacy, such as anonymization of data, access controls, and clear policies governing data usage and retention.
  • Employee involvement – Get feedback from employees about the monitoring practices and be open to making changes based on their input. Once you’ve found the right balance, ensure that policies and practices remain consistent, fair, and respectful of each employee’s rights.
  • Regular evaluations – Assess the effectiveness and impact of monitoring on both employees and the organization regularly. If employees report that monitoring is deeply affecting their well-being, privacy, and productivity, you may have to consider adjusting your monitoring policies or even abandoning them altogether.

Keeping your workers safe and productive is a challenge, and online employee monitoring is just one tool in the toolbox. If you need more ideas on how to optimize productivity and address cybersecurity risks, call us today.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

While all types of fraud pose serious challenges, identity fraud is one of the most potent, and consumers must take extra care to detect and avoid it. People need to educate themselves on protecting their personal information, but many might feel they don’t know where to begin. Five main steps can be taken to guard against identity fraud and stop fraudsters and scammers from obtaining personal information or accessing accounts.

Beware of phishing

Phishing emails are a vital tactic for scammers and have developed beyond the clumsy, poorly written-efforts of the past. However, many still contain tell-tale signs of a scam, such as lousy formatting and unofficial email addresses. Phishing emails are designed to convince consumers to click on a malicious link, so consumers should avoid following links they do not recognize. Pay extra attention to an email that calls for immediate action, such as requiring payment to keep your energy on; scammers know that consumers are more likely to make a mistake if there’s urgency.

The best way to root out the fakes is to independently check the information by logging into personal accounts on the company website—companies will often post a warning on their website if they are aware of the scam email. Smishing, where phishing is conducted via a text message, isn’t a new threat but has evolved during the COVID-19 pandemic and represents another avenue where consumers need to be hyper-vigilant.

Activate two-factor authentication

Many online accounts offer two-factor authentication, which can help to prevent online account takeover. Text messaging is the most popular second factor, but this is also vulnerable to takeover, so individuals should choose an alternative factor if one is available.

Sign up for activity alerts from financial institutions

Signing up for activity alerts with bank or credit card companies can alert consumers to any suspicious activity associated with their accounts. People are notified straight away, and this can prevent any further fraudulent charges or withdrawals. Do not delay reporting suspected fraud to your bank, and ask about the possibility of closing the account in question.

Set up identity and credit monitoring

Individuals can sign up for an identity and credit monitoring service that will warn them if their data is at risk. Due to personal information being traded on the dark web, monitoring services focus on places where data is known to be bought and sold and will send alerts if personal data is identified. Credit monitoring services will notify individuals of any changes to their credit profile, such as new trade lines or hard credit inquiries. If individuals suspect fraudulent use of their information, a professional can assess the extent of the fraud and assist with identity restoration.

Follow password security best practices

There is a lot of advice available on how to create strong, unique passwords for every account. However, with the average person having 70-80 accounts, it can be difficult to remember them all, leading many people to reuse passwords. Installing a password manager can help you generate and store passwords for all your accounts on your devices. Although using common passwords like “QWERTY” or your pet’s name is not safe, it can suggest a nearly impossible alternative to guess.

The most important thing to remember is that there is no single solution to ensure complete protection against identity theft. The best thing you can do is to stay vigilant and use caution. By adopting the layers of security discussed above, you can give yourself the highest level of protection against a threat that is certain to become increasingly dangerous in the future.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechRadar SOURCE

Email attacks against businesses have increased dramatically as hackers continually use generative AI tools to optimize their content and streamline malicious campaigns, new research has claimed. 

A new report from Acronis based on data collected from more than a million unique endpoints across 15 countries, found AI-powered phishing affected more than 90% of organizations last year, and that AI helped email attacks grow by 222% between the second half of 2023, and today.

“There’s a disturbing trend being recognised globally where bad actors continue to leverage ChatGPT and similar generative AI systems to increase cyberattack efficiency, create malicious code, and automate attacks,” said Candid Wüest, Acronis VP of Product Management. “Now, more than ever, corporations need to prioritize comprehensive cyber protection solutions to ensure business continuity.”

Leveraging Chat-GPT

Email attacks, mostly phishing, remain the primary vectors of infection, the report further states, with organizations experiencing a notable 54% increase in the number of attacks, per firm. Most of the attacks happened in Singapore, Spain, and Brazil, and Acronis identified a third of emails (33.4%) as spam. An additional 1.5% contained malware, or phishing links, it said.

Phishing is the primary infection vector for a number of reasons: email is omnipresent, it’s simple to use, and it’s cheap. It’s also easy to automate. Finally, victims overwhelmingly trust their email service providers to keep them safe from threats, often clicking on links and downloading attachments without second-guessing their good nature. 

In the pre-ChatGPT era, the easiest way to spot a phishing attack was to just use common sense and read the email message. Hackers are rarely English majors (many don’t live in English-speaking countries), and their messages were full of spelling and grammar mistakes, as well as clumsy wording and different inconsistencies. However, since the introduction of generative AI tools, email messages have become significantly more convincing. 

“The Acronis Cyberthreats Report H2 2023 highlights the continued threats faced by businesses of all sizes worldwide,” said Michael Suby, Research VP, IDC. “Unfortunately, bad actors continue to profit from these activities and are leveraging AI-enhanced techniques to create more convincing phishing schemes, guaranteeing that this problem will continue to plague businesses.”

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechRadar SOURCE

Microsoft 365 users are waking up to a major change in how they view their files after the office software’s default font finally began to change.

Aptos, which was previously known as Bierstadt, replaces Calibri, a long-serving font that became the default for the Microsoft 365 in 2007.

Microsoft describes Aptos as a “precise, contemporary sans serif typeface inspired by mid-20th-century Swiss typography.”

Microsoft has changed your default font

Aptos belongs to the “grotesque sans serif” genre, which is characterized by its block-style letters without calligraphic flourishes or contrast between thick and thin strokes, according to the new font’s designer, Steve Matteson, citing Helvetica as one of the genre’s most famed examples, which was created by Switzerland’s Haas Type Foundry in 1957.

Redmond first shared that it had started looking for a new default font in 2021, and by July 2023, it confirmed that Aptos would be rolling out to “hundreds of millions of users” of Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Outlook users in the months following the announcement.

Principal Program Manager for fonts and Typography, Microsoft Office Design, Si Daniels, said that the new font should embody “professionalism, adaptability, subtle flourishes of expression, and more clarity.”

Given that few users opt to select another font other than the default, it clearly has a lot to live up to. Documents written in Aptos will now circulate in every single sector in a variety of capacities, highlighting the need for versatility above all else.

Besides Regular, Aptos is available in Light, SemiBold, Bold, ExtraBold, and an even heavier Black.

Moreover, Microsoft 365 users will continue to notice design tweaks and improvements beyond font changes – the company has also revealed a new theme, encompassing a new color palette, text styles, and more.

If you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechRadar SOURCE