While small businesses lack the big budgets of their enterprise counterparts, that doesn’t make security any less of an issue for SMBs. In fact, small and medium businesses are more and more often the target of cyber criminals precisely because they generally have fewer security measures in place. So to ensure your business has enough security to stay protected, here are a number of rules every SMB should follow to keep themselves secure.

Security rules for SMBs to follow

Recognize where your most critical data lies

Is it in the cloud? Hard drives? Backup disks? Mobile devices? Whether or not you have the budget and resources to adequately secure all of your data, the critical data that your business relies on must be sufficiently secure. If you’re unsure of what that is, ask yourself which data you would need to access within 24 hours of your business suffering a major disaster, in order to ensure your operations remained up and running. Once you’ve answered this question, talk with your IT managers to determine the security measures that need to be implemented to protect your most vital data.

Learn the basics

After you’ve bulletproofed your critical data, it’s time to arm your network with the basics. If you haven’t already done so, ensure that you have anti-malware protection on servers and endpoints, and firewalls for both wireless and wired access points.
If you have the budget, it’s worth seeking outside counsel from an IT expert fluent in today’s security best practices. They’ll ensure your business is protected from the latest cyber threats. However, if you don’t have the budget, then it’s time to take matters into your own hands. Read up on security trends, join technology networking groups, and ask your fellow business owners about their own IT security policies.

Cash a reality check

Bad things happen to nice people. Tornadoes, fires, thieves, and faulty technology couldn’t care less about how your business donates to local charities and supports your community’s youth sports clubs. What’s more, hundreds of small businesses across the country suffer severe data loss each year. Ignorance and turning a blind eye will not protect you, so make a wise decision and automate your data to be backed up daily. This allows your business to remain in operation if you’re hit by a security breach.

Dispose of old technology properly

Whether it’s a computer, server or tablet, any device that stores data on it must be properly disposed of when it conks out. Specifically, the hard disk must be destroyed completely. And remember, proper data disposal is not only limited to technology, as critical information is also revealed on paper files. So if you’re migrating the content of physical documents to the cloud, make sure to shred the paper versions too.

Mind your mobiles

The mobile age is here, and along with it come employees who may access your business’s critical information via their smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices. Recognize that many of these devices have different operating systems that require varying security measures. You and your IT manager should be aware of this, which leads to our last point…

Think policy

Have a policy for all your company’s devices. If you don’t inform your employees they shouldn’t access company information via their phones or tablets, then they’ll likely assume it’s okay to do so. But thinking policy doesn’t pertain only to mobiles. You should also determine acceptable online behavior for your employees, as well as how data should be shared and restricted. Put this in writing, and then have your employees read and sign it.
Of course, it’s not always wise to be overly restrictive. Rather the point is to have policies in place and make everyone in your organization aware of them because if you don’t each staff member will make up their own rules.

Are you concerned your business’s security isn’t up to par? Need the guidance of a seasoned IT provider who specializes in security? Talk to us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. SOURCE

The risks of using passwords – GC Infotech

We all use passwords to access and protect sensitive online data—whether it’s logging onto the network at work, shopping for goods on the web, or accessing personal email. Passwords are a basic function of the way we work, live, and socialize; yet as anyone who has had an account hacked can tell you, password protection is far from perfect.

With personal data playing an ever-larger role in the way we do business, current password functionality is in need of an overhaul. If you’re looking for a better way to secure your personal and professional data, here’s what you need to know.

The problem with hashing

In theory, passwords should work: if someone doesn’t know your password, they shouldn’t be able to log into a site or an account as you. Unfortunately, outdated storage methods and a lack of universal best practices have made it increasingly easy for hackers to get their hands on your passwords—and your data.

Each time you register a password with a website or service, that organization needs to store your password somewhere in order to authenticate your identity later. Some organizations store your password as plain text, which leaves you and your data extremely vulnerable if the sites’ password lists are accessed by unauthorized users or hackers. Security-minded sites take pains to create a protected version of your password known as a “hash,” dicing up your password into small pieces and rearranging the pieces so that they no longer resemble the original. In this case, when you re-enter your password, it goes through a hashing function where the result is compared to the stored hash for verification.

The thought behind password hashing is that if hackers manage to breach a website or online service, they won’t be able to steal users’ intact passwords. Instead, the hackers will be left with difficult-to-crack hashes that are either unusable or take a very long time to reverse engineer into passwords. However, with the rise of powerful, off-the-shelf components such as modern graphics cards and lists of pre-generated hashes for short passwords, hackers can easily reverse engineer passwords.

A modern high-end graphics card, for example, can easily perform more than 600 million SHA256 hash operations per second. A few of these relatively inexpensive cards arranged in an array can try every possible eight character password in about seven days. While that’s impressive enough already, attackers have far more advanced ways to crack hashes, and with the right tools they can crack hundreds of passwords per hour.

“Online sites are aware of these issues,” explains Jim Waldron, Senior Architect for Platform Security at HP, “and so some of them have increased the security by adding secret questions and answers like: ‘What is your mother’s maiden name?’ Unfortunately, much of this ‘private’ information can be legally purchased from online data aggregators.” In other words, even users’ private personal information is no barrier to a determined hacker.

The problem with best practices

To make the situation worse, once a hacker obtains a user’s password, they can use this information to try and access the rest of the user’s online accounts—such as their email or bank accounts. The reason for this is that most consumers—and businesses—skirt password best practices.
A secure password should adhere to three basic rules:

  • It should be long — at least 16 characters1
  • It should be complex — containing uppercase letters, lowercase letters, numbers, symbols, and spaces
  • It should be unique — i.e. you only use it once

You’re probably familiar with at least a few of these rules. Many password systems require users to create passwords of a certain length and complexity, but the resulting passwords are hard to remember and many users recycle the same password multiple times. In fact, 54% of consumers use five or fewer passwords across their entire online life, while 22% use three or fewer.2

So what’s next for passwords?

With all these issues, combined with an increasing number of high-profile online data breaches, the public is losing faith in passwords. Nearly 70% of consumers report lacking a high degree of confidence that their passwords can adequately protect their online accounts—and they’re calling on online organizations to add another layer of security to the process.2

“At a very high level,” says Waldron, “what we need are new, more secure methods for users to identify themselves to online services—methods that are also easy for users to perform.” While broad changes will take time and a large joint effort, there are some immediate actions businesses can take to improve their own authentication methods.

Passwords are still an important security feature, despite their many problems. Check the strength of your passwords—make sure they are long, complicated, and never repeat. You probably already have access to a Password Manager which can store your unique passwords for you. This is an efficient way to eliminate the headaches normally associated with remembering complicated passwords across multiple sites. You can also try to institute several layers of authentication at once—such as a fingerprint reader plus a password, or an iris scanner plus a smartcard reader. This is known as multi-factor authentication and is much more secure than any one method alone.

The absolute best way a business can ensure that their systems and networks are secure is to work with an IT partner like us. Our managed services can help ensure that you have proper security measures in place and the systems are set up and managed properly. Tech peace of mind means your focus can be on creating a successful company instead. Contact us today to learn more.

[1] CNET, The guide to password security (and why you should care)
[2] Telesign, Telesign Consumer Account Security Report

Published with permission from Hewlett Packard. SOURCE

Over the decades of the internet’s existence, cyber threats have evolved at a rapid pace. When once there were only viruses and malware to watch out for, now you have to protect your business from worms, trojans, ransomware and dozens of other online threats. But what’s the difference between all of them? Let’s take a look. Here are four of today’s most common cyber threats and the tips you need to protect your business from them.

Malware is the short version of the word malicious software. And this is a general term that encompasses many types of online threats including spyware, viruses, worms, trojans, adware, ransomware and more. Though you likely already know this, the purpose of malware is to specifically infect and harm your computer and potentially steal your information.

But how do the different types of malware differ from one another? How can you protect your business from them? Let’s take a look at four of the most common forms of malware below.

Virus

Like a virus that can infect a person, a computer virus is a contagious piece of code that infects software and then spreads from file to file on a system. When infected software or files are shared between computers, the virus then spreads to the new host.

The best way to protect yourself from viruses is with a reliable antivirus program that is kept updated. Additionally, you should be wary of any executable files you receive because viruses often come packaged in this form. For example, if you’re sent a video file, be aware that if the name includes an “exe” extension like .mov.exe, you’re almost certainly dealing with a virus.

Spyware

Just like a spy, a hacker uses spyware to track your internet activities and steal your information without you being aware of it. What kind of information is likely to be stolen by Spyware? Credit card numbers and passwords are two common targets.And if stealing your information isn’t bad enough, Spyware is also known to cause PC slowdown, especially when there is more than one program running on your system – which is usually the case with a system that’s infected.

A common mistake many people make is they assume their antivirus software automatically protects them from Spyware. This is not always true as some antivirus isn’t designed to catch spyware. If you’re unsure if your antivirus prevents Spyware, get verification from your vendor. And for those that are already suffering from Spyware infestation, two programs that work wonders to clean it out are Malwarebytes and SuperAntiSpyware. If you are still unsure what to do, reach out to one of our IT experts.

Worms

Similar to viruses, worms also replicate themselves and spread when they infect a computer. The difference, however, between a worm and a virus is that a worm doesn’t require the help of a human or host program to spread. Instead, they self-replicate and spread across networks without the guidance of a hacker or a file/program to latch onto.

In addition to a reliable antivirus software, to prevent worms from infecting your system you should ensure your firewall is activated and working properly.

Trojan

Like the trojan horse from ancient greek mythology, this type of malware is disguised as a safe program designed to fool users, so that they unwittingly install it on their own system, and later are sabotaged by it. Generally, the hacker uses a trojan to steal both financial and personal information. It can do this by creating a “backdoor” to your computer that allows the hacker to remotely control it.

Similar to the other malware mentioned above, antivirus software is a dependable way to protect yourself against trojans. For further safety, it’s wise to not open up suspicious attachments, and also ensure that your staff members aren’t downloading any programs or applications illegally at the office – as this is a favorite place hackers like to hide

Curious to learn about other common malware that can cause trouble for business owners? Want to upgrade your existing network security system? Give us a call today, we’re sure we can help.

Security-concept-Shield

Cyber Security Myths Small Businesses

We are teaming up with the leading internet security companies to help small businesses resolve to be better about their cyber security in 2015. Experts have repeatedly cautioned businesses of all sizes against the dangers of leaving data unprotected, leading to tightened security measures across the country. Professionals still are not sure they have done everything they can to protect their networks, since many business owners and department managers would never claim to be tech experts.

Small businesses are especially concerned about network safety. Industry publications and blogs are filled with warnings about cyber threats, leaving entrepreneurs unsure what to believe. In all of this, several myths have emerged. To help small businesses discern truth from fiction, here are a few of the most popular cyber security myths.

Our IT Provider Handles That

Many small businesses outsource IT, either to a cloud provider or a local company that handles tech support. Whether IT is handled by an in-house IT professional or one that is offsite, IT can only go so far in protecting your network. In truth, the biggest threat to an organization is its own employees, who engage in risky behaviors like unsafe web surfing, clicking on unsecure email links, and careless password behavior, among other activities.

The truth is, regardless of the resource you entrust with your IT security, the ultimate responsibility falls on your business’s leaders. If an incident occurs, your own staff will be forced to answer to your customers, as well as any regulatory authorities. While some providers accept a certain amount of liability, a business’s reputation can still be damaged.

My Business Flies Under the Radar

Hackers are increasingly targeting small businesses, seeing them as relatively easy targets. Big businesses take extreme precautions on their networks, making it almost impossible for malicious activity to get through. Realizing small businesses don’t have the resources to invest in heavy-duty security measures, hackers see those business types as prime targets.

It’s important to check your business’s IT security measures and ensure strong encryption is in place. If you’re using cloud service providers, carefully scrutinize each service’s security measures and ensure your data is safe.

Make sure you have good antivirus protection

Invest in a strong antivirus product, make sure the product stays up to date and schedule regular scans of your devices. These products provide critical protection to secure your PCs, Macs, smartphones and tablets against viruses, malware, spam and more. It’s crucial to take a look at all of the technology devices that make your small business run, and make sure you have cyber security protection for all. For instance, a recent survey of small business owners found that while nearly all have a cyber security system installed on their desktops (98 percent) and laptops (96 percent) only around two-thirds (65 percent) do so on their tablets, and a little over half (56 percent) on their smartphones.

To keep your business safe, you’ll need the latest standards in data encryption for every data transmission, as well as strict password requirements on your servers. Your devices should be encrypted, as well, to protect against theft and any mobile devices should have remote-wiping capabilities. For additional tips on how to resolve to be better about cyber security in 2015, reach out to GCInfotech to assess your current network security and any potential vulnerabilities.

Cyber attacks are a real concern for businesses today, but it’s important to be able to separate myth from reality. Education is key to protecting your business against an attack and keeping your business and customer data safe.

 

Most of us know we should make our passwords more difficult (sorry, folks, “1234” or “qwerty” just doesn’t cut it) and use an up-to-date version of antivirus software. But all too often, we opt for an easy life – use familiar passwords and put upgrades on the back burner. But security can be simpler than you think so here are a few not-so obvious tips that will make your online experience a whole lot safer. Here are three to keep in mind.

Embrace two-factor authentication

Also known as two-step verification, most of us have likely dealt with this at one time or another. When you’re logging onto your bank’s website or your email account from a different computer than you normally use, you’re sometimes prompted for a one-time password – sent to you via text message, email or via some other method.

Nowadays, many sites such as Facebook, Dropbox and Twitter also give you the option to use two-factor authentication each time you log in. So if you’re looking for an easy way to up your security, it can give you that extra protection without slowing you down too much.

Update browsers and devices

Did you know that dated versions of browsers, operating systems and even other software packages can create an easy entry point for hackers? Often, new updates are created specifically to fix security holes. And hackers are ever aware that people can be lazy – saving that update for another day that never seems to come. They’ll often try to take advantage of this, searching for outdated devices to infiltrate while their victims watch YouTube on last year’s version of Firefox.

Yes, installing an update might take 15 minutes of your time. But it can pay dividends in preventing a security breach that could cost you or your business thousands.

Use HTTPs

When was the last time you typed those letters into a browser? Probably not this decade. It’s no wonder most people are unaware of this tip. So for those who are oblivious, https is the secure version of http – hypertext transfer protocol. Believe it or not, that last “s” actually adds an extra layer of protection. It encrypts information sent, both ways, between a website’s server and you.

You’re probably thinking, adding that last “s” to http (or even typing in http in general) is a complete pain in the rear. So to make this easier you can actually install a program like “HTTPS Everywhere” that’ll automatically switch an http into an https for you. Currently “HTTPS Everywhere” is available for Firefox, Chrome and Opera.

Looking for more tips to boost your internet security? Get in touch to find out how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. SOURCE

 

Privacy and security are major concerns for businesses developing a data protection strategy. Ensuring critical data is safely backed up, kept private, and readily available is essential to maintaining productivity and eliminating downtime caused by data-related interruptions or malfunctions. Implementing a data backup plan that meets your privacy and protection needs is a business priority.

Online backup services provide an ideal combination of protection and privacy. Most of them offer a variety of unrestrictive options that encourage businesses to scale plans to fit their specific security, storage space, and pricing needs.

Utilizing a trusted cloud service for data backup promotes heightened privacy and protection for your critical files in a number of ways:

  • Keeping data backups offsite ensures data is protected from physical harm such as theft or natural disasters like fires, floods, etc.
  • Having backups in the cloud allows for remote management and data is able to be restored to any location with internet access.
  • The redundancy used in the online backup process provides the assurance that there will always be a backup available, no matter what.
  • Data is always stored safely using a highly secure encryption process and many services also offer a private key for extra protection.

Some industries are governed by strict regulations and are required to follow specific guidelines for storing and backing up sensitive data. Most online backup services are able to work with individual businesses to ensure they are meeting compliance regulations and mandates. It’s important to do your research before signing up with any cloud service; make certain you know their privacy policies and security procedures. The success of your business can only be improved by taking the appropriate measures to fully safeguard your data. Whether your business is regulated or not, data security and privacy should be a priority in your online backup strategy.

Sources:
Maier, Fran. “Can There Ever Really Be Privacy in the Cloud?” Mashable. N.p., 19 Oct. 2011. Web. 06 Jan. 2014.
Spector, Lincoln. “Is Cloud-Based Backup Safe?” PCWorld. N.p., 22 Aug. 2011. Web. 06 Jan. 2014.

In October of last year news broke about a new form of malware called Cryptolocker. This malware posed a particularly large threat to many business users and led to many quick and important security updates. Now, almost a year later, it appears that the second version of this – CryptoWall – has been released and is beginning to infect users.

What is Crypto malware?

cryptowall-exCrypto malware is a type of trojan horse that when installed onto computers or devices, holds the data and system hostage. This is done by locking valuable or important files with a strong encryption. You then see a pop-up open informing you that you have a set amount of time to pay for a key which will unlock the encryption. If you don’t pay before the deadline, your files are deleted.

When this malware surfaced last year, many users were understandably more than a little worried and took strong precautions to ensure they did not get infected. Despite these efforts, it really didn’t go away until earlier this year, when security experts introduced a number of online portals that can un-encrypt files affected by Cryptolocker, essentially neutralizing the threat, until now that is. A recently updated version is threatening users once again.

Cryptolocker 2.0, aka. CryptoWall

Possibly because of efforts by security firms to neutralize the Cryptolocker threat, the various developers of the malware have come back with an improved version, CryptoWall and it is a threat that all businesses should be aware of.

With CryptoWall, the transmission and infection methods remain the same as they did with the first version: It is most commonly found in zipped folders and PDF files sent over email. Most emails with the malware are disguised as invoices, bills, complaints, and other business messages that we are likely to open.

The developers did however make some “improvements” to the malware that make it more difficult to deal with for most users. These changes include:

  • Unique IDs are used for payment: These are addresses used to verify that the payment is unique and from one person only. If the address is used by another user, payment will now be rejected. This is different from the first version where one person who paid could share the unlock code with other infected users.
  • CryptoWall can securely delete files: In the older version of this threat, files were deleted if the ransom wasn’t paid, but they could be recovered easily. In the new version the encryption has increased security which ensures the file is deleted. This leaves you with either the option of paying the ransom or retrieving the file from a backup.
  • Payment servers can’t be blocked: With CryptoLocker, when authorities and security experts found the addresses of the servers that accepted payments they were able to add these to blacklists, thus ensuring no traffic would come from, or go to, these servers again. Essentially, this made it impossible for the malware to actually work. Now, it has been found that the developers are using their own servers and gateways which essentially makes them much, much more difficult to find and ban.

How do I prevent my systems and devices from being infected?

Unlike other viruses and malware, CryptoWall doesn’t go after passwords or account names, so the usual changing of your passwords won’t really help. The best ways to prevent this from getting onto your systems is:

  • Don’t open any suspicious attachments – Look at each and every email attachment that comes into your inbox. If you spot anything that looks odd, such as say a spelling mistake in the name, or a long string of characters together, then it is best to avoid opening it.
  • Don’t open emails from unknown sources – Be extra careful about emails from unknown sources, especially ones that say they provide business oriented information e.g., bank statements from banks you don’t have an account with or bills from a utilities company you don’t use. Chances are high that they contain some form of malware.

Should your files be attacked and encrypted by this malware, then the first thing you should do is to contact us. We can work with you to help find a solution that will not end up in you having to pay the ransom to recover your files.

If you are looking to learn more about CryptoWall malware and how to boost your security and protect your data and systems, then let GCInfotech be your first line of tech defense.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. SOURCE

FirewallCartoonWith the ever growing number of security threats faced by businesses around the world, the vast majority of business owners have adopted some form of security measures in an effort to keep their organizations secure. But, how do you know the measures you’ve implemented are actually keeping your systems safe? Here are five ways you can tell if your security measures aren’t sufficient.

1. Open wireless networks

Wireless networks are one of the most common ways businesses allow their employees to get online. With one main Internet line and a couple of wireless routers, you can theoretically have the whole office online. This method of connecting does save money, but there is an inherent security risk with this and that is an unsecure network.

Contrary to popular belief, simply plugging in a wireless router and creating a basic network won’t mean you are secure. If you don’t set a password on your routers, then anyone within range can connect. Hackers and criminal organizations are known to look for, and then target these networks. With fairly simple tools and a bit of know-how, they can start capturing data that goes in and out of the network, and even attacking the network and computers attached. In other words, unprotected networks are basically open invitations to hackers.

Therefore, you should take steps to ensure that all wireless networks in the office are secured with passwords that are not easy to guess. For example, many Internet Service Providers who install hardware when setting up networks will often just use the company’s main phone number as the password to the router. This is too easy to work out, so changing to a password that is a lot more difficult to guess is makes sense.

2. Email is not secure

Admittedly, most companies who have implemented a new email system in the past couple of years will likely be fairly secure. This is especially true if they use cloud-based options, or well-known email systems like Exchange which offer enhanced security and scanning, while using modern email transition methods.

The businesses at risk are those using older systems like POP, or systems that don’t encrypt passwords (what are known as ‘clear passwords’). If your system doesn’t encrypt information like this, anyone with the right tools and a bit of knowledge can capture login information and potentially compromise your systems and data.

If you are using older email systems, it is advisable to upgrade to newer ones, especially if they don’t encrypt important information.

3. Mobile devices that aren’t secure enough

Mobile devices, like tablets and smartphones, are being used more than ever before in business, and do offer a great way to stay connected and productive while out of the office. The issue with this however is that if you use your tablet or phone to connect to office systems, and don’t have security measures in place, you could find networks compromised.

For example, if you have linked your work email to your tablet, but don’t have a screen lock enabled and you lose your device anyone who picks it up will have access to your email and potentially sensitive information.

The same goes if you accidentally install a fake app with malware on it. You could find your systems infected. Therefore, you should take steps to ensure that your device is locked with at least a passcode, and you have anti-virus and malware scanners installed and running on a regular basis.

4. Anti-virus scanners that aren’t maintained

These days, it is essential that you have anti-virus, malware, and spyware scanners installed on all machines and devices in your company and that you take the time to configure these properly. It could be that scans are scheduled during business hours, or they just aren’t updated. If you install these solutions onto your systems, and they start to scan during work time, most employees will just turn the scanner off thus leaving systems wide-open.

The same goes for not properly ensuring that these systems are updated. Updates are important for scanners, because they implement new virus databases that contain newly discovered malware and viruses, and fixes for them.

Therefore, scanners need to be properly installed and maintained if they are going to even stand a chance of keeping systems secure.

5. Lack of firewalls

A firewall is a networking security tool that can be configured to block certain types of network access and data from leaving the network or being accessed from outside of the network. A properly configured firewall is necessary for network security, and while many modems include this, it’s often not robust enough for business use.

What you need instead is a firewall that covers the whole network at the point where data enters and exits (usually before the routers). These are business-centric tools that should be installed by an IT partner like us, in order for them to be most effective.

How do I ensure proper business security?

The absolute best way a business can ensure that their systems and networks are secure is to work with an IT partner like us. Our managed services can help ensure that you have proper security measures in place and the systems are set up and managed properly. Tech peace of mind means the focus can be on creating a successful company instead. Contact us today to learn more.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. SOURCE

Tips On How Small Businesses Can Secure Their Wireless Networks

In a corporate environment, wireless networking should be as secure as your wired LAN, especially with the growing adoption of BYOD (bring your own device).
Today’s employees use smartphones and tablets as an extension of their workstations, which raises concerns of how secure they are from leaks and hacking.
What can businesses do to secure their Wi-Fi network and at the same time tap into all of the resources on the corporate LAN – as well as the cloud -with confidence?

Here are some tips

Don’t rely on WEP encryption.

If your Internet service provider (ISP) set up your Wi-Fi, it likely enabled encryption. This version of encryption, however, may be an older security option that’s now easily breakable: Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP). The Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) encryption method was debunked long ago and provides inadequate Wi-Fi security. The WEP encryption keys can be cracked, in some cases, within minutes. You should use the Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA or WPA2) encryption method.

Use the Enterprise version of WPA/WPA2

To prevent employees from seeing the encryption keys or passphrases and having them loaded on their computers, you should use the Enterprise version of WPA or WPA2 rather than the Pre Shared Key (PSK) or personal version. Otherwise, when an employee leaves the company, he or she will still have the key to unlock the network. Additionally, their laptop could be stolen and a thief could have the key.

WPA/WPA2-Enterprise hides the actual encryption key; it’s never loaded onto the computers. After everything is configured, users log onto the network with a username and password that can be changed or revoked. Most likely, you will need a professional IT installation for WPA/WPA2

Do Not Leave Ethernet Ports Exposed

Though you can use the latest Wi-Fi encryption, it’s useless if someone plugs directly into a port within the building and can access the network. Moreover, your employees could even plug their own AP into a port, intentionally or not, giving out open wireless access. Make sure that all routers, APs, and network devices are hidden and secure. You could use hard to get into locations like closets, or the space above false ceilings.

Use Extra Encryption (VPNs)

To encrypt the wired side of the network and for double Wi-Fi encryption, you could use VPNs. You can buy a standalone VPN server, install server software on a computer, or purchase a hosted service. Every computer on the network could be configured to connect with the VPN server. Then even the users’ traffic on the wired side of the network will be encrypted and double encrypted over the airwaves.

Eliminate Possible Connection To Other Networks

“We have seen cases when employees were intentionally connecting to neighboring networks because they were faster”, said John Murray, VP of Operations at GCInfotech.

Since computers may be sharing files or have sensitive data on them, you need to prevent them from connecting to other networks. Check Windows to make sure it isn’t set to auto connect to available networks. In Vista, you can even use the WLAN commands for the Netsh utility to block all networks but yours.

Keep Hardware Updated

Securing your network and computers requires some maintenance. You need to periodically check for firmware updates for the router, access points, and other network components. You also need to keep track of the network adapters that are loaded in the computers and update them with new drivers if and when they become available. Additionally, make sure the operating systems on all the machines are kept update-to-date with security patches and fixes. Keeping everything maintained will help ensure any known vulnerabilities are addressed and any new security features are supported.

security

Protect your business with mission critical data back-up strategies.

Inadequate protection or spotty management of critical data can have profound effects on sustainability. Regular scheduled testing of your data back-up strategy and implementing a daily back-up routine will help prevent the disasters that prove fatal for many companies.

  • 31% of PC users have lost all of their files due to events beyond their control.
  • 34% of companies fail to test their onsite back-up solution, and of those that do, 77% have found back-up failures.
  • 60% of companies that lose their data will shut down within 6 months of the disaster.
  • Every week 140,000 hard drives crash in the United States.
  • Simple drive recovery can cost upwards of $7,500 and success is not guaranteed.

GCInfotech recommends that you assess your existing data protection and data back-up strategy and consult your IT professional to learn what data repository and storage medium options are available. It’s important to understand traditional backup methods as well as the benefits of developing an enhanced protection solution that flexibly meets the challenges of today’s business environment.

Fun Facts: 

  • There are over 600 IT firms in Ireland, including Intel, Google, HP, & Dell.
  • Irish firms in the US employ over 80,000 people in the 50 states.
  • Since 1956 Ireland has maintained one of the lowest corporate tax rates.
  • The US is Ireland’s top export destination.  
  • US tech investment in Ireland is higher than Brazil, Russia, India and China combined.
  • There are 36.9 million US residents with Irish roots. This number is more than eight times the population of Ireland itself (4.6 million).