With all the recent hacking scares all over the world, you know and understand that your cyber security and your business’s cyber security are extremely important. However, when it comes to authentication processes, you may not be sure what the real deal is. There are two seemingly similar types of authentication that are often confused. Those are, of course, two-step and two-factor authentication. Find out more about the differences between the two here to ensure your cyber security will always be top of the line.

If you are seeking out a way to improve your business’s cyber security, both for your business itself as well as for your customers, you are likely looking at your authentication process. Two-step and two-factor authentication are two of the most commonly used options in cyber security. And in current cyber security, many businesses use the terms two-step and two-factor authentication interchangeably.

There are, however, subtle differences between the two. A two-step authentication process requires a single-factor login (such as a memorized password or biometric reading) as well as another of the same type of login that is essentially sent to the user. For example, you may have a memorized password for your first step and then receive a one-time-use code on your cell phone as the second step.

Two-step authentication does function to add an extra step in the authentication process, making it more secure than a single-step authentication (i.e. just the password). However, if a person or business is hacked, it will do only a little to stop hackers from getting a hold of whatever they are looking for.

On the other hand, there is two-factor authentication (sometimes referred to as multi-factor authentication), which is significantly more secure. This type of authentication requires two different types of information to authenticate. For example, it could be a combination of a fingerprint or retinal scan as well as a password or passcode. Because the types of information are different, it would require a hacker a great deal more effort to obtain both forms of authentication.
In essence, every two-factor authentication is a two-step authentication process, but the opposite is not true. With this information in mind, you can be certain that you are using the right type of authentication in your business to keep your business and customer information as secure as possible.

Your network needs the best security technology has to offer. What type of authentication that results in is just one of hundreds of choices that must be made to achieve that end. To take the stress out of securing and protecting your network, call us today for all the help you could ever ask for.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

One of the biggest myths that I hear from our customers is that small businesses aren’t as susceptible to security breaches as large enterprises. The truth is, just because you’re small doesn’t mean you aren’t vulnerable. In fact, by 2019, the cost of cybercrime is expect to soar to $2 trillion.

Small businesses haven’t historically been the target of cybercrime, but that is changing: In the U.K. alone, nearly 75 percent of small businesses reported a security breach in 2015, an increase over the preceding two years. Why the change? Hackers prey on small businesses as opposed to larger ones because small businesses tend to have lower security defenses, which includes working on outdated software, often due to lack of financial and human resources.

This shift underscores how critical security is to businesses today. However, that small businesses aren’t at risk for security breaches is only one of the misconceptions I hear from our customers today.

Myth: The cloud isn’t secure

Chances are, if you’re a small business, you don’t have an in-house IT department. You might work with an external consultant, or you might just be doing it all yourself as many small business owners do. For this reason, many small businesses are moving their physical technology infrastructure to the cloud because of the many security benefits it provides. Cloud solutions give businesses peace of mind that their data is secure by providing automatic updates to ensure they are always benefiting from the latest security advances. And because business owners can rest easy knowing that they are always on the latest technology, they can spend their time doing what really matters – growing their business, acquiring new customers, etc.

This kind of always-on security is what drew Romax, one of the U.K.’s leading marketing communications businesses, to the cloud. The company moved to a combination of Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and on-premises solutions (a hybrid model) for enhanced security because it needed to be in compliance with tight information security policies regarding retaining client data. The company’s move to the cloud provided Romax owner Wesley Dowding with peace of mind knowing he could focus on his business. “I can go to sleep at night knowing that if the place went down, we’d still be able to serve our clients and our data is secured,” he said.

Myth: I’m not big enough to be susceptible to security risks

At Microsoft, our customers’ security is always top of mind. That’s why we invest more than a billion dollars per year in security-related research and development and build best-in-class security features into all of our cloud solutions that protect against security risks that small businesses may not realize they are susceptible to, such as:

  • Lost and/or stolen devices: With employees working across multiple devices from multiple locations, it’s not uncommon for devices to get lost or even stolen. Microsoft BitLocker, included in Windows 10, encrypts all data stored on the Windows operating system, ensuring that even if an employee leaves his mobile phone on the bus or has her laptop stolen from her car, the data stored on it remains secure.
  • Employee error: It takes something as simple as an employee opening the wrong mail or clicking on the wrong link to compromise your systems and data. To help thwart the risk of this kind of employee error, Microsoft Outlook comes with built-in anti-phishing detection to help prevent fraudulent email messages from even reaching your employees in the first place.
  • Outdated technology: Running outdated solutions has a significant impact on small businesses – data shows that small businesses that are running the latest technologies can increase their annual revenues 15 percentage points faster and create jobs twice as fast as businesses using outdated solutions. On top of that, a different study revealed that 91 percent of consumers said they would stop doing business with a company because of its outdated technology. With Office 365 and Windows 10, security updates happen automatically so you never have to worry about whether or not you are protected against the latest threats.
  • Weak passwords: Hackers are becoming more and more sophisticated, and if your passwords (and your employees’ passwords) aren’t becoming more sophisticated at the same time, you could be at risk for a breach. Fortunately, Windows 10 users benefit from the Windows Hello & Microsoft Passport features that enable them to replace passwords with biometric authentication such as face, iris or fingerprint identification for greater security.
  • Data backup: Backing up your files can help reduce losses in the event of a physical security breach – like a break-in at your office or stolen devices – and get you back up and running quickly. Microsoft OneDrive for Business – included in all Office 365 commercial plans – provides a secure place to store documents in the cloud so you can always access them from anywhere or any device – even when you’re offline.

Myth: If I haven’t been compromised yet, what I’m doing is probably enough

Security experts like to say that there are two kinds of businesses in the world today: Those that have been hacked and those that don’t know they have been hacked yet. Data from a recent cybercrime study proved this to be true: according to the Ponemon Institute, it takes – on average – 170 days to detect a malicious attack.

It was just such a situation Chelgrave Contracting, an Australian maintenance and labor hire company, found itself facing. The company’s General Manager, Greg Scott, discovered the company’s antivirus software had expired six weeks before without triggering an alert. The lapse prompted a minor virus attack, with only luck preventing the company’s PCs from develop a major virus outbreak, Scott says.

Chelgrave turned to Microsoft Intune, which includes endpoint protection built on Microsoft’s powerful Malware Protection Engine, enabling Scott to provide all Chelgrave PCs with real-time security updates. Remote and mobile employees now receive these updates simply by connecting to the Internet, ensuring their laptops retain the highest levels of protection.

This example underscrores the importance of not letting your security lapse – after all, security breaches can be devastating to small businesses – and making sure you are using the right technology, like Windows 10, Intune and Office 365, that protects you 24/7.

Truth: Security is vital to small business success

Security will continue to play an increasingly vital role in the success of SMBs, which are targeted by hackers now more than ever before. Taking basic steps will make your business safer, but using Microsoft technology allows a business and its employees the peace of mind that their data — their own and clients’ — is secured.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment.

Published with consideration from Microsoft. SOURCE

Cyber security is an important topic to address, not only for your personal files and accounts, but also for your clients.

As mentioned in previous posts, both the ABA and many State Bars state that lawyers must take reasonable precautions to prevent client information falling into an unintended recipients hands as a part of their general guidance’s.

One of the first steps to ensure that your client’s information is safe is to make sure your personal accounts are safe.

I recently came across an article from The New York Times about just this topic: How to Devise Passwords that Drive Hackers Away. Besides the obvious red flags about hackers (such as avoiding suspicious links).

Here are some take-aways from the article to help better ensure both your personal files as well as your clients are protected.*

Never use the same password twice

Although it is much easier for you to remember 1 password for all 20 online accounts, it’s also that much easier for a hacker to get into all of those 20 online accounts from your Facebook Page to your online bank account.

Come up with a passphrase

Lengthwise, a password should be at least 14 characters (or more!). The longer your password, the longer it will take a hacker to crack it. Sometimes it is easier to remember a phrase (like your favorite movie quote) than a longer password.

Store your password securely

Just because you’ve now come up with clever, extremely lengthy passwords for every single online account you have, you’re not in the clear yet. Make sure you keep these passwords secure! That means avoid leaving any of them on a post-it note on your desk. If you keep the passwords on a file on your computer, make sure it’s a secure file that only you have access to. Or if you don’t want any ability to track your passwords on your computer, whatever you write them on, make sure it’s locked away. Also leaving password hints are typically better than writing down the actual password.

*Note: these take-away’s are tips to increase password protection; however, can still not ensure 100% protection.
Published with consideration from Thomson Reuters SOURCE

Employees are on the front lines of information security. The more that can be done to regularly educate yourself of the small things you can do can go a long way towards protecting your organization.

Since it is the beginning of the year, many people are returning to work and trying to get out of “vacation mode.” (Us too!) We’ve decided to outline some tips to help you throughout the year to stay safe online while protecting your company in the process.

General Best Practices

  • Avoid providing personal information when answering an email, unsolicited phone call, text message or instant message.
  • Never enter personal information in a pop-up web page or anywhere else that you did not initiate.
  • Keep security software and all other software programs updated.
  • Cyber Security Best Practices

  • Phishers will try to trick employees into installing malware, or gain intelligence for attacks by claiming to be from IT. Be sure to contact your IT department if you or your coworkers receive suspicious calls.
  • Don’t leak intellectual property- even accidentally. Sharing a picture with a whiteboard or computer screen in the background online could reveal more than someone outside of your company should see.
  • Report security warnings from your Internet security software to IT immediately, chances are, they aren’t aware of all threats that occur.
  • If traveling, alert your IT department beforehand, especially if you’re going to be using public wireless Internet. If offered, make sure you know how to connect to the company’s Virtual Private Network (VPN).
  • Be cautious of links and attachments in emails from senders you don’t recognize. Phishers prey on employees who open these without checking them out, opening the door to malware.
  • If you’re unsure about an email’s legitimacy, contact your IT department or submit the email to Symantec Security Response through this portal.
  • Online Behavior

  • Don’t steal. Taking intellectual property and releasing professional secrets are likely against corporate policies. Your company may track sensitive documents and you could get into hot water.
  • Read your company’s Acceptable Electronic Use (AEU) policy, and follow the policies for safe use of your devices.
  • When backing up to cloud services, be sure to talk to your IT department first, for a list of acceptable cloud solutions. Organizations can make this part of their AEU policy and make it a fire-able offense.
  • Best Practices for When to Contact Support

  • Call IT before you get in over your head. Often what starts as a simple update can be made more complex by attempting to “fix” the problem.
  • When you Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), ask your IT department if your device is allowed to access corporate data before you upload anything to it. Use authorized applications to access sensitive documents.
  • Learn the process for allowing IT to connect to your system. This can save time when you contact support and they need access to resolve an issue.
  • Learn basic computer hardware terms. This can save valuable time when you contact support and don’t have to describe the “mouse connector-thingy.”
  • Used with permission from Norton by Symantec by Nadia Kovacs

    As today’s companies are increasingly tending to run their business on the basis of digital assets, information security has become an even more critical factor of the business model, as it protects the most essential asset: information.

    We know that security is not a goal, but rather a process. As such, prevention and constant reinforcement of the outer edge of the corporate system are vital elements in the defense of assets in cyberspace.

    But despite this, contingencies occur, and the risk of suffering a security breach must always be considered. So let’s look at what action we should take in the face of this type of scenario to overcome a situation in which the organization’s resources could be compromised.

    Here 5 steps to take after a company is infected:

    Step 1: Determine the scope of the infection

    Time and time again, companies that have been victims of infections assess the traces of the impact just by using their intuition, rather than by means of an analytical examination of the problem. Clearly, after detecting an infection at the company, reaction speed is extremely important. However, hurrying to make groundless appraisals can divert your attention away from the right actions to take.

    If the necessary precautions have been taken, and there has consequently been an investment into the development of robust contingency management systems, it is possible to quickly gather the bits of evidence you need to answer some of the first key questions.

    In this way, to be begin with it is necessary to establish which systems have been compromised and in what way. Is the infection limited to a single piece of equipment or subnetwork? Has any sensitive data leaked out? Are we talking about corporate data, or private data relating to employees and/or customers?

    Step 2: Ensure continuity of service

    In the case of a leak of information which might compromise employees or end users, the second step would be to give them a warning of the possible breach and advise them to watch out for any unusual movements they might notice regarding the data they have stored under your service.

    If any physical equipment has been seriously compromised, you must set in motion any processes to activate backup resources, in order to maintain customer service. For this reason, it is critically important to plan your defense against attacks on availability, creating redundancy of equipment and connections. This, together with an action plan suitably defined at the level of the organization, will enable a rapid response to any events that lay siege to corporate security.

    Step 3: Contain the infection

    The containment of an infection begins with isolation of the equipment that you know has been compromised. Shutting down the segments of the network that include this equipment prevents the infection from continuing to spread throughout the corporate network, and interrupts any connection that may have been established with the attacker for the purpose of stealing information.

    If the traffic generated by the malicious agent turns out to be encrypted, the analysts must try reverse-engineering it to obtain the cryptographic keys. However, if communication is taking place on non-confidential protocols like HTTP, it will be exponentially easier to track the commands used by the attacker.

    Either way, studying these commands can lead the investigation to the discovery of new infected equipment, and the generation of traffic patterns should be translated into firewall rules, to quickly generate a first line of defense.

    To achieve this, it is necessary to have correctly labeled traffic captures in order to speed up processing. Once again, it’s self-evident that proactive prevention and detection of threats are the cornerstone of information security and define a company’s capacity to respond in times of crisis.

    Given that most of the procedures mentioned involve non-automated analysis of information, it is crucial to put in place a comprehensive corporate security solution in advance. This will make it possible to instantly deploy actions to block any harm that a malicious agent might attempt to inflict after penetrating your defenses.

    The latest generation of ESET corporate solutions was developed to be a key factor in the containment process, thereby preventing the spread of infectious components through the company’s different transaction systems.

    Step 4: Mitigate the infection and eliminate the line of attack

    Removal of the malicious part is a complex procedure which initially involves a detailed analysis of the code in order to understand how it works. Antivirus solutions support this type of activity by enabling automatic disinfection and saving valuable time in the process of responding.

    It is essential to understand that if the attackers are not completely eradicated from the network, they can resume their fraudulent activity on the infected equipment through another line of attack. Because of this, it is of vital importance to isolate the flaw that allowed them to enter in the first place, and then remove it from the system.

    Even after equipment identified as compromised has been cleaned, there remains a risk that other undiscovered infected equipment is still in operation. To prevent this from occurring, we need to reinforce the analysis of the packets transmitted by the network, as we now have the advantage of knowing the communication protocols and commands used thanks to the previous analysis of the infection.

    Together with a review of the firewall rules, changing the passwords on corporate networks is another preventive measure to take after detecting compromised resources, as this is one of the favored goals in corporate attacks. While the process of updating keys may take time and effort, it will prevent the attackers from using any stolen information to disguise themselves as a legitimate user.

    At this point, it is worth establishing whether the infection was the simple result of carelessness online, or whether it constitutes a successful link in a chain of persistent targeted attacks.

    If it is established that the infection was specifically targeting the organization, the real question to answer will be who lies behind these events, bearing in mind that another attack could be imminent.

    Step 5: Learn from any errors

    Carrying out an in-depth investigation into what happened will give cause for improving the processes within the organization. The removal of any vulnerabilities whose existence was previously unknown provides an opportunity to reinforce the perimeter of the corporate networks by identifying any other potential points of access to the system that had not previously been considered as falling within the scope of lines of attack.

    Infections are always absolutely negative events for a company; however, they offer opportunities to learn. They show which elements of the system’s design need to be strengthened and they allow you to discover the flaws in the current defense measures.

    Published with consideration from ESET. SOURCE

    Every time a stolen laptop leads to a data breach, you wonder why the business involved hadn’t set up any safeguards. When the unencrypted laptop was stolen from a former physician at the University of Oklahoma, for instance, or when a laptop was stolen from insurance provider Oregon Health Co-op containing data on 15,000 members.

    You’d think money would motivate them, if nothing else. In November, EMC and Hartford Hospital were ordered to pay US$90,000 to the state of Connecticut over the theft of an unencrypted laptop in 2012 containing data on nearly 9,000 people. The laptop was stolen from an EMC employee’s home.

    The problem extends far beyond the healthcare industry, too—such as the laptop stolen from SterlingBackCheck, a New York-based background screening service. The laptop contained data on 100,000 people.

    These types of breaches don’t quite grab the same headlines as major cybercrimes and hacking incidents, if only because a thousand employees affected by a laptop theft is less dramatic than 40 million customers at Target. But it’s a lot easier to steal a laptop than it is to hack into a corporate database, so the theft and loss of laptops, as well as desktops and flash drives, highlight the need for enhanced physical security and employee training.

    It’s easier to steal a laptop than to hack a database

    The organizations mentioned here have wised up. A spokesperson for the University of Oklahoma said it has launched an encryption program and new training for employees when it comes to handling sensitive data.

    SterlingBackCheck said it has updated its encryption and audit procedures, revised its equipment custody protocols, retrained employees on privacy and data security, and installed remote-wipe software on portable devices.

    Another threat to your data is the proliferation of Bring You Own Device (BYOD) policies and mobile workers.Gartner anticipates that half of all companies will have some need for a BYOD policy by 2017. Workers will be using their own devices as well as company-issued ones in the office or on the go. This opens up a new risk if devices are lost or stolen.

    Security firms like Sophos urge companies to put a robust policy in place for the handling of professional devices, including full disk encryption as well as encrypted cloud and removable media. A strong password is highly recommended too, but it’s not enough on its own.

    A greater sense of urgency wouldn’t hurt, either. In Oklahoma, the physician had actually left his position at the university before his personal laptop went missing. He couldn’t say for sure whether it contained sensitive data, but by the time that possibility arose, it was too late.

    In another incident, at manufacturer Tremco, an employee lost a company-issued laptop on a plane. It was several weeks before the employee realized that it contained spreadsheets of personal employee data.

    Encryption, remote wiping, better data tracking

    Companies need to know where their data is at all times—not just what device it is on, but where that device is located physically.

    This highlights the need for remote wiping tools, which SterlingBackCheck has put in place. If a laptop is lost or stolen, the company should have an easy way to remotely wipe the sensitive data to ensure it never leaks.

    Much like large-scale hacking attacks, it’s the consumer or the patient that really suffers when a data breach occurs. The onus lies with the company to handle this data responsibly, whether it’s in the cloud or on a laptop on the bus.

    Published with consideration from PCWorld. SOURCE

    Adapt to Survive: Keeping One Step Ahead of Cyber Threats

    There have been numerous high profile cyber-attacks in recent years, of privacy companies and government agencies. In May 2014, eBay was hacked and had to announce that personal details of 233 million of its users had been stolen. In November of the same year Sony suffered a similar fate when 102 million of its user accounts were compromised, and several emails were leaked from its high ranking Hollywood executives. Earlier this year, it was discovered that the United States Office of Personal Management suffered from two large-scale hacks, resulting in the theft of millions of employee personal files.

    Against this backdrop of ever increasing cyber threats—and when you consider how much sensitive data is held by law firms—you realize how vital it is for the legal industry to keep data secure. Especially when the outcome of a legal case and the reputation of the legal firm concerned rests on it.

    Security Audit

    For each individual case a busy law firm will usually be privy to large numbers of physical documents, they will hold considerable amounts of electronic data, and there will be vast numbers of exchanges between clients that may contain sensitive information. Therefore, there are considerable potential vulnerabilities and the first step is to have all the risks professionally assessed by a cyber-threat specialist. Once you know where the gaps lie in your security, you can take steps to address them. A good way to do this, especially after an audit, is to create an Information Security Policy that lays out guidelines for your staff to ensure data is kept secure.

    Some high profile clients may wish to audit your firm from a security point of view before they appoint you. This is particularly true of those industries which are heavily regulated, such as health insurance, and payment card processing companies. If you have already carried out your own internal audit, then this eventuality shouldn’t be such a daunting experience.

    Keeping Documents Safe

    It is imperative that the records a legal firm holds are kept safe to protect their clients’ reputations as well as the fact that any breach could result in damage to ongoing lawsuits. The best option is to employ the services of a secure document management company that can protect your data whilst giving you the flexibility to access it whenever needed, an important point given the day to day practicalities of life in a law firm. These providers will be subject to their own auditing and will use high levels of both physical and data security to protect your assets. They can also store both hard copy documents and data.

    Firewall and Anti-Virus Software

    Your internal network and website should have a firewall as the first line of defense. Anti-virus software is also important to protect you from malware. In one recent cyber case involving a legal firm, they were subject to spear phishing. This is when an email is opened which seems to come from a trusted source that the firm recognizes. The email then installs malware which sits in the background gathering sensitive data for the hacker.

    Anti-virus software needs to be updated regularly and all systems should be scanned on an ongoing basis. These updates and scans should be set to run automatically by your IT department, to avoid human error.

    Encryption and Off-Site Servers

    The ideal solution for a legal firm is to have all their data held off-site in a high security data center. Furthermore all data held should be encrypted and all communications, including email, should also take place through encrypted connections. Encryption is important as then even if your data center is hacked your information should still remain secure.

    Even if your law firm is relatively small, you aren’t immune to hacking. The FBI recently warned that even small and medium sized firms are now coming under attack. A law firm’s reputation is paramount. Clients expect their data to always remain confidential and the success of a case may rest on this fact. With the stakes so high are you willing to risk your reputation and a subsequent loss of business when some key steps taken now can do a great deal to protect you? Are you concerned your business’s security isn’t up to par? Need the guidance of a seasoned IT provider who specializes in security? Talk to us today.

    Published with consideration from Law Technology.SOURCE

    Most business owners have an employee handbook. But when it comes to the online security of their business, often times this portion is either not adequately addressed, or not addressed at all. However, with cyber crimes an ever increasing threat, and the fact that employee error is one of the most common causes of a security breach, it is incredibly vital that your staff is informed of your policies. Here are four policies that every business owner should share with their employees.

    Internet

    In today’s business world, employees spend a lot of time on the Internet. To ensure they’re not putting your business at risk, you need a clear set of web policies. Here are three important ones to keep in mind:

    1. Employees should be using the Internet for business purposes only. While this is undoubtedly hard to avoid without blocking specific websites, having a policy in place should at least cut back on employees spending time on non-business related sites.
    2. Prohibit unauthorized downloads. This includes everything from music to games, and even data or applications.
    3. Accessing personal email should not be done on business devices. If employees must access their own email account during the day, they can do so on their smartphone or other personal device.

    These are just a few Internet policies to get started, but you should also consider including information on your recommended browsing practices and your policies for using business devices (such as company phones) on public wifi.

    Email

    Just like with the Internet policy mentioned above, company email accounts should only be utilized for business use. That means your employees should never use it to send personal files, forward links or perform any type of business-related activities outside of their specific job role. Additionally, consider implementing a standard email signature for all employees. This not only creates brand cohesion on all outgoing emails, but also makes it easy to identify messages from other employees, and hence helps prevents spear phishing.

    Passwords

    We’ve all heard the importance of a strong password time and time again. And this same principle should also apply to your employees. The reason is rather simple. Many employees will create the easiest to crack passwords for their business accounts. After all, if your organization gets hacked, it’s not their money or business at stake. So to encourage employees to create strong passwords, your policy should instruct them to include special characters, uppercase and lowercase letters, and numbers in their passwords.

    Data

    Whether or not you allow your employees to conduct work on their own device, such as a smartphone or tablet, it is important to have a bring your own device (BYOD) policy. If your employees aren’t aware of your stance on BYOD, some are sure to assume they can conduct work related tasks on their personal laptop or tablet. So have a BYOD policy and put it in the employee handbook. In addition to this, make sure to explain that data on any workstation is business property. That means employees aren’t allowed to remove or copy it without your authorization.

    We hope these four policies have shed some light on best security practices. If you’d like more tips or are interested in a security audit of your business, do get in touch.

    Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.SOURCE

    investing2As a small or medium sized business owner, you likely have your hands full. Between managing your staff, looking for growth opportunities and keeping clients happy, you probably have little time to dedicate to new technology purchases. Being so busy, it can be easy to make a mistake when choosing an IT solution. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of common IT investment missteps that every business owner needs to avoid.

    Investing in the newest technology instead of the best fit

    It’s the job of every marketer to make you believe the newest technology on the market will resolve all your problems. And while the latest cloud or virtualization offering is likely to make things better for many individuals and organizations, it isn’t going to work for everyone.

    Don’t let the flash and hype of a new product deceive you. Take the time to think about the results you’re trying to achieve with technology. Make a list of them, and when you’re done match those criteria with the product that fits. A GCInfotech professional will be happy to serve as your consultant to ensure you make the best choice.

    Believing everything will magically work together

    As technology evolves, it is inevitably becoming simpler to use. Consumers want user friendly products and solutions that are easy to implement, and nowadays that’s what they’re getting – at least most of the time. Because of this belief that all products are going to be plug-and-play, many business owners hold the misguided assumption that any new technology they implement is automatically going to synchronize with their other IT. It is simply not true.

    Though many technologies are compatible with one another, your business is taking a big risk – that could result in massive downtime and wasted money – if you implement a new tool that doesn’t integrate well into your current system and workflow. Be smart, do some research or consult with a GCInfotech professional before making a purchase.

    Assuming your team doesn’t need support and training

    Now that you’ve found the perfect fit technology and you’re sure it will integrate into your current IT setup, you go ahead and purchase it. You let out a sigh of relief as you kick back and let your sparkly new IT solution power your company to new levels of success and profits in a SMB “happily ever after” fantasy. Sound too good to be true? That’s probably because it usually is.

    Don’t forget that not all of your employees are going to instinctively know how to use the new technology. Consult with GCInfotech to review their support and training offerings for your particular technology solution.

    Forgetting to create a budget

    More and more IT solutions are packaged with pay-as-you-go monthly pricing. While this is a great way to help you avoid large upfront capital investment, if you implement too many different technologies too fast – and without thinking about the recurring costs – you could quickly run out of money before having properly created a complete technology platform.

    Think about what you’re comfortable spending on IT before you open your wallet. Do some research, and either draft a budget on your own or acquire the assistance of a GCInfotech consultant to help you along.

    Failing to get staff input

    It’s wise to consult with the employees who will be using the new technology you implement, on a daily basis. It’s even wiser to do it before you purchase it.

    The truth is that not all of your employees may be on board with the new product. They may actually even know some downsides to it you weren’t aware of. Regardless, it’s smart to consult with them beforehand, or you may find yourself in a constant fight getting them to adopt it.

    Get a Single Source for all your Needs

    Starting with your investment in new technology, and continuing through desktop services, cloud computing technologyremote IT solutions, remote disaster recovery, outsourcing disaster recovery and managed infrastructure services, GCInfotech is the one source you can count on for all of your support requirements. Because we can work on all aspects of your information technology, we can develop an end-to-end perspective to meet all your business computing needs-and thereby offer you better, integrated services than single-solution providers.

    GCInfotech can help you take full advantage of your investment in a new technology solution, whether you’re just beginning the process of adopting it, or facing the challenges of upgrading, maintaining, and optimizing a system that’s already in place. Find out how with a complimentary consultation from GCInfotech.

    Please contact us for more information or call 888-323-3066 to speak to our IT experts right away.

     

     

    Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org.  SOURCE

     

    Recent advancements in information technology have dramatically impacted the way law firms manage their offices.  As a result of these innovations, attorneys are now able to handle larger caseloads, have enhanced communications with clients, and easily sift through massive hoards of information faster then ever thought possible. The role that technology plays in the legal profession has become critical…and the growing complexity of technology cannot be ignored. Given the speed, sophistication and unpredictability of the new world of technology, So how does the average law firm executive manage to keep pace with and juggle all of the intricacies of their IT environment?

    It’s likely that you’ve already considered hiring, or have in fact, hired an internal IT staff person. And it’s likely that additional salary, particularly one that is not billable, was a difficult and painful decision. Maybe there was this one person in the office who “knows a lot about computers” and was willing to take on the role.  Now, despite the fact that their primary job responsibility has absolutely nothing to do with technology, everyone in the firm is now relying on this person for help. Even a qualified outside expert who is brought in – even from another competing Law firm – will still have to now become familiar with your firm’s nuances and idiosyncrasies – and will bring a host of preferences and limitations.

    Here’s are 8 things your law firm should consider when outsourcing their IT operations:

    1. Improved Reliability & Performance – Most outside IT firms utilize higher-end tools and best practices as they are in the heart of the industry and as a rule must stay on top of new innovations and latest and greatest technologies.  Hence they are able to identify and resolve the root causes to network issues more quickly than someone who is inside the firm.  This reduces any resulting downtime issues as well as the duration of outages that may occur.
    2. Skill-Set Sophistication – Outside firms are comprised of teams – not individuals.  Hence, in hiring a firm, by default you have access to a wide variety of knowledge, experience, specialization and skill sets. This ensures that all aspects of your IT needs can be met with the best and most current solution.
    3. Scaled Resources & Expertise –When outsourcing your IT operations, you’re leveraging a staff that is dedicated solely to fixing your computers, servers, internet, software systems, etc. They in turn spend money, resources and training time to ensure that the best service is delivered. You benefit from their investments – and save unmanageable costs associated with certifications, training, software licenses and education. This frees up time for you to run your business.
    4. Business Continuity – A good outside IT firm will monitor your systems 24x7x365.  They will also have resources on deck in the event of an emergency. An internal IT person, will offer the “illusion” of availability – but people take vacations, quit without notice – and in some cases without handing over passwords, documentation, knowledge, etc.
    5. Predictable Management Costs – Disasters are not predictable- and they can be costly – particularly if there is no disaster plan and disaster resource. With an outside firm, you won’t be caught spending unplanned lumps of money in a desperate situation (e.g. server crash). In these cases a set monthly budget can be used specifically for issue avoidance, prevention, and service optimization.
    6. Client Access and Visibility: Attorneys need to be available and accessible – 24 hours a day. For most clients, their lawyer is a lifeline, and knowing that their firm’s technical infrastructure is always at arms length can sometimes be the difference between success or failure. This runs across ALL technical aspects of the firm: email, phone systems, internet content, messaging, financial data, files and data access; any and all areas of client or potential client touch points are critical.
    7. Rock Solid Reliability: Law is a demanding and stressful profession. In order to justify their hourly fees, Attorneys cannot afford to spend any time or energy dealing with technology snafus. They require systems that have been properly engineered and work as expected all of the time so they are able to bill their hours to clients & not have to worry about lost hours on non-client related activities.
    8. Comprehensive Service Offering: Law firms need to be laser focused, and are best served by outside firms that provide complete end-to-end service technical expertise. One single point of contact for all technical needs offers the most efficient and user-friendly scenario. Whether it is email support, networking, software management, cloud services, hosting, telephone systems, messaging support, mobile application support, the cost of having to manage multiple specialists creates too many communication layers and can distract from client-oriented tasks.

    Overall, outsourcing your IT operations allows firms to keep focused on servicing their clients. Whether you have 5 people or 500, there are plans available to fit any firm size, location or business needs. Make sure that the firm you select has the tools, experience, and expertise to keep your firm running at peak performance.

    GCInfotech is proud to provide IT services for law firms in CT, New York City and beyond.  Call us 203 327 5700, send us email and we will reach out to you, or schedule your free IT systems management assessment.