Common SEO mistakes to avoid – Creating an effective search engine optimization (SEO) strategy for your business’s website is a must if you want to establish a solid online presence. While this concept is nothing new, it is often overlooked by businesses. They resort to crude SEO practices that, far from being efficient, actually get their website into hot water with major search engines. With that said, you need to avoid falling victim to these common SEO mistakes.

You skip the keyword brainstorming phase

This is perhaps the biggest mistake you can make in your website creation plan. By not spending time on researching relevant keywords from the start, you are missing out on the opportunity to potentially generate a large amount of traffic. Without a comprehensive keyword list in hand, you will find it hard to add more keywords as your website grows and gains more authority.

Your content has too little or too much text

There’s no fixed formula when it comes to the length of your content – the number of words can vary greatly depending on your audience and the type of your website. The general rule of thumb, however, is to write content that is valuable for your visitors. Make sure your pages only contain relevant information, and don’t try to cram text just to put more copy on the page, because search engines will have a hard time identifying relevant content.

You’re using black-hat SEO techniques

It may be tempting to go after cheap practices that promise quick results, also known as black-hat SEO techniques. These methods include keyword stuffing, hidden keyword text, link buying, and so on. Some of these techniques may actually work, but only in the short run. Search engines are aware of black-hat schemes, and are continuously improving their algorithms to weed out websites that don’t abide by their guidelines to deliver the best user experience. So it’s best to focus your efforts on building a clean and stable SEO strategy.

You’re expecting quick results

Success doesn’t come easy in the SEO world. Ranking high in search results necessitates spending a substantial amount of time and effort. Don’t expect to earn a position on the first page of search engines immediately or overnight, because it will likely take months to see results. Be patient, and focus on creating great content and abiding by SEO best practices.

You’re not using blogging as a strategy

Most businesses don’t really have the chance to update their website often. Why? Because they can’t really update their “About Us” or their service pages as frequently as they would like – so their websites are just going to stand there dormant and outdated. The problem with this is that search engines don’t like inactive sites. If you have a blogging strategy, however, you have the opportunity to add a page, or pages, to your site at least once a month, if not once a week or better yet daily! The more new pages you add to your website, the more chance you have of getting higher rankings, which translates into more traffic and more leads.

Your website has an inefficient structure

Without a good website structure strategy, you’ll have a hard time trying to organize new categories, as well as information and promotional pages. Having a bloated and scattered site structure won’t do you any good when it comes to SEO, because you’ll only make it harder for visitors to navigate around your website.

You’re not going responsive

Search engines are now taking responsiveness into account when determining rankings. A responsive website adapts its page layouts to fit all screen resolutions and sizes, whether it’s being viewed on a desktop computer, laptop, tablet, or smartphone. You can greatly enhance the user experience and decrease bounce rates (the percentage of visitors who leave the website after visiting only one page). So if your website is not mobile-friendly, then it’s time to seriously consider a responsive design.

There are so many factors involved in search engine rankings, some of which are beyond your control. The important thing is to avoid making these SEO mistakes, and you’ll be on your way to online success. Want more SEO tips and techniques to add value to your business? Get in touch with our experts today.

Cloud computing is here to stay, and the buzz throughout industry and government is that hybrid clouds will become the new norm going forward. Hybrid clouds, according to industry experts, can offer the security of on premise, private clouds and the flexibility and agility of commercial public clouds. The Gartner research firm predicts almost half of all large, global enterprises will have deployed hybrid clouds by the end of 2017, with 2016 being a defining year where they will start to move away from private into hybrids.

As inevitable as the cloud is to most organisations, this migration could challenge the management of identity and access privileges of users on your networks and IT systems. There are a few things to keep in mind as your company decides to push forward into a hybrid cloud and the necessary unified management framework that doing so will require.

The virtues of virtual private networks

Virtualization is a means of positioning computing resources (e.g. servers, operating systems, storage, networks) so they may maximise the use of physical computing resources across multiple users. It’s a huge step in the journey toward the hybrid cloud. Thankfully, over the past few years, virtualization technology has expanded from simply running virtual machines on supercomputers to offering all levels and types of virtualized services and networks.

Moreover, virtualization allows a single physical server to run multiple guest operating systems as a way of making more efficient use of the hardware. The technology allows organisations to free up data center space and achieve greater IT operational and energy efficiencies.

In fact, many organisations have been engaged in server virtualization projects for a number of years and are moving on to client, desktop and storage virtualization projects. Part of the formula for success is evaluating capacity planning and other infrastructure assessment tools that can give IT managers a sense of their resource utilisation and help them decide which applications to virtualize.

But like most powerful tools, this is a double-edged sword. Remote access to online resources can effectively negate perimeter defenses and extend the domain of the insider threat worldwide.

Systems need to be able to authenticate the identity of users, and in some cases also the devices being used for access together with the location and type of networks or resources being used. Only then can access privileges be securely granted, based not only on identity, but also the user’s role in the organisation and the circumstances of the connection. An employee connecting to a system during business hours over a secure network might be given wider privileges than when connecting from the other side of the world in the middle of the night, for instance. Hypersocket Software is introducing a suite of access management tools that provide a common user experience and enable organisations to enforce least privilege policies for remote users.

The Hypersocket VPN provides a cost effective alternative to IPsec or Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol for secure browser-based remote access with the ease of use of SSL. It lends itself well to Bring Your Own Device scenarios, because the client has no direct access to the network. The ability to have connections to multiple sites at the same time enables secure access to a corporate LAN and other resources such as a private cloud without the need for a permanent bridge between them.

The VPN comes in two editions, a free Open Source version that provides basic connectivity under the GNU General Public License v3 and an Enterprise Edition that provides the additional features required by security-conscious organisations. The server can be installed on any operating system supporting Java and client support currently is available for Windows and Apple OS X.

To enable access, the administrator defines one or more Network Resources using the HSF resource architecture, which identifies individual TCP/IP services that can be assigned to users through their roles.

The Enterprise Edition adds further support, including support for users logging in from Active Directory, branding, auditing, accessing file systems over WebDAV and extended file system support such as Amazon S3, SFTP. It allows for configurable authentication flows and new authentication mechanisms. An Audit Log records all events, which are searchable by event type, session or user. Reports can be exported as CSV, XML or PDF, and administrators have full control over how long the server keeps the data before it is archived.

Published with consideration from ITProPortal. SOURCE