Despite efforts to protect your data, some breaches are beyond your control. When an online company with your personal details gets hacked, you have no choice but to manage your risks on your own. These practical tips can help you reduce risks of identity theft and other threats.

Determine what was breached

Whether its names, addresses, email addresses, or social security numbers, it’s critical to know exactly what type of information was stolen before determining what steps to take. For example, if your email address were compromised, you’d take every precaution to strengthen your email security, which includes updating all your login credentials.

Change affected passwords immediately

Speaking of passwords, change yours immediately after any breach, even for seemingly safe accounts. Create a strong password comprised of alphanumeric and special characters, and make sure you never reuse passwords from your other accounts.

Once you’ve changed all your passwords, use a password manager to help you keep track of all your online account credentials.

If the website that breached your information offers two-factor authentication (2FA), enable it right away. 2FA requires two steps to verify security: usually a password and a verification code sent to a user’s registered mobile number.

Contact financial institutions

In cases where financial information was leaked, call your bank and credit card issuers to change your details, cancel your card, and notify them of a possible fraud risk. That way, banks can prevent fraud and monitor your account for suspicious activity.

Note that there are different rules for fraudulent transactions on debit cards and credit cards. Credit card transactions are a bit easier to dispute because they have longer grace periods. Debit card fraud, on the other hand, is more difficult to dispute, especially if the fraudulent transactions happened after you’ve notified the bank.

Place a fraud alert on your name

Hackers who have your personal information can easily commit identity fraud. To avoid becoming a victim, contact credit reporting bureaus like Equifax, Experian, or Innovis and request that a fraud alert (also called credit alert) be added to your name. This will block any attempt to open a credit account under your name and prevent unauthorized third parties from running a credit report on you.

 

Putting a credit freeze on your name might result in minor inconveniences, especially if you have an ongoing loan or credit card application. Still, doing so will greatly reduce your risks of getting defrauded.

These steps will ensure you don’t fall victim to identity theft in the event of a large-scale data breach. If you want to take a more proactive approach to protect your sensitive information against breaches, contact our cybersecurity experts today.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment.

 

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

When talking about cyberattacks, the first one that usually comes to mind is phishing, a scam that uses email to spread malware or steal personal information. But hackers have a new method to infiltrate your systems, and it’s surprisingly effective. Here’s what you need to know about watering hole attacks.

What are watering hole attacks?
Much like phishing, a watering hole attack is used to distribute malware onto victims’ computers. Cybercriminals infect popular websites with malware. If anyone visits the site, their computers will automatically be loaded with malware.

The malware used in these attacks usually collects the target’s personal information and sends it back to the hacker’s server. Sometimes the malware can even give hackers full access to their victims’ computers.

But how does a hacker choose which websites to hack? With internet tracking tools, hackers find out which websites companies and individual users visit the most. They then attempt to find vulnerabilities in those websites and embed them with malicious software.

Any website can fall victim to a watering hole attack. In fact, even high-profile websites like Twitter, Microsoft, Facebook, and Apple were compromised in 2013.

You can protect yourself by following these tips.

Update your software
Watering hole attacks often exploit bugs and vulnerabilities to infiltrate your computer, so by updating your software and browsers regularly, you can significantly reduce the risk of an attack. Make it a habit to check the software developer’s website for any security patches. Or better yet, hire a managed IT services provider to keep your system up to date.

Watch your network closely
To detect watering hole attacks, you must use network security tools. For example, intrusion prevention systems allow you to detect suspicious and malicious network activities. Meanwhile, bandwidth management software will enable you to observe user behavior and detect abnormalities that could indicate an attack, such as large transfers of information or a high number of downloads.

Hide your online activities
Cybercriminals can create more effective watering hole attacks if they compromise websites only you and your employees frequent. As such, you should hide your online activities with a VPN and your browser’s private browsing feature.

At the end of the day, the best protection is staying informed. As cyberthreats continue to evolve, you must always be vigilant and aware of the newest threats. Tune in to our blog to find out about the latest developments in security and to get more tips on how to keep your business safe. To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

If you’re disturbed by advertisements and “helpful” suggestions that are based on your internet browsing habits, recent research has found yet another source of online tracking. It’s a sneaky tactic that also comes with serious security concerns. Let’s take a look at what you can do to stop it from targeting you.

Why auto-fill passwords are so dangerous
In 2015, the average internet user had 90 online accounts, a number that has undoubtedly grown since then. This has forced users to create dozens of passwords, sometimes because they want to practice healthy security habits and other times because the platforms they’re using have different password requirements.
Web browsers and password manager applications addressed this account overload by allowing usernames and passwords to be automatically entered into a web form, eliminating the need for users to hunt down the right credentials before logging in.
The process of tricking a browser or password manager into giving up this saved information is incredibly simple. All it takes is an invisible form placed on a compromised webpage to collect users’ login information without them knowing.

Using auto-fill to track users
Stealing passwords with this strategy has been a tug-of-war between hackers and security professionals for over a decade. However, it has recently come to light that digital marketers are also using this tactic to track users.
Two groups, AdThink and OnAudience, have been placing these invisible login forms on websites as a way to track which sites users visit. These marketers made no attempts to steal passwords, but security professionals said it wouldn’t have been hard to accomplish. AdThink and OnAudience simply tracked people based on the usernames in hidden auto-fill forms and sold that information to advertisers.

One simple security tip for today
Turn off auto-fill in your web browser. It’s quick, easy, and will go to great lengths to improve your account security.
• If you use Chrome – Open the Settings window, click Advanced, and select the appropriate settings under Manage Passwords
• If you use Firefox – Open the Options window, click Privacy, and under the History heading select “Firefox will: Use custom settings for history.” In the new window, disable “Remember search and form history.”
• If you use Safari – Open the Preferences window, select the Auto-fill tab, and turn off all the features related to usernames and passwords.

This is just one small thing you can do to keep your accounts and the information they contain safe. For managed, 24×7 cybersecurity assistance that goes far beyond protecting your privacy, call us today.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

Whether it’s because of government surveillance or cyberattacks, internet users are more concerned than ever about the privacy of their online activities. Unfortunately, security measures like firewalls and antivirus software can’t help you in this case, but there’s one that can: Virtual Private Network (VPN).
 
What is VPN?
Simply put, a VPN is a group of servers you connect to via the internet. Once you’ve established a connection, your computer acts as if it’s on the same local connection as the VPN, making it seem like you moved to a different location.
When you surf the web through a VPN, all the data transmitted and received is also encrypted, preventing anyone — from hackers to government agencies — from monitoring your online activities.
 
Why should you have one?
Of course, security and privacy are major reasons why you would want a VPN. For example, if you’re connected to a public WiFi network — like the ones you typically see in local cafes and airports — using a VPN encrypts the information you’re sending or accessing online. This means things like credit card details, login credentials, private conversations, or other sensitive documents can’t be intercepted by a third party.
VPNs are also useful for accessing geo-restricted websites. If you’re traveling abroad and certain US websites are blocked in that region, you can simply connect to a VPN located in the US to access the sites you need.
 
Which VPN should you choose?
Given the increasing demand for secure online privacy, VPNs are surging in popularity. The following considerations can help you find the right one.
 
1. Cost
While free VPNs are available, we strongly suggest you avoid them. These keep logs of your internet activity, and in some cases sell them to the highest bidder. Maintaining a VPN service is also expensive, which means the free ones will likely plaster ads on your browser to make a quick buck.

Paid VPNs like SurfEasy and StrongVPN often come with more robust features and configurations that keep you secure. What’s more, they don’t keep a record of the sites you visit and hound you with pop-ups that lead to dangerous websites.
 
2. Location
The physical location of VPN servers is important if you want to access region-blocked websites. So if you’re planning on accessing a UK-based service, your VPN provider must at least have servers installed in London.
 
3. Capacity
Read through a VPN provider’s terms of service to determine how much data you’re allowed to use. If possible, find out how many servers a VPN provider has. If they have plenty of servers online, you can rest assured that they have the capacity to support your internet browsing.
 
4. Device compatibility
Another important factor to consider is whether the VPN can be used across multiple devices. Nowadays, employees work on laptops, tablets, and smartphones, so you’ll want a VPN that’s compatible with all these.
 
5. IP leaking
Finally, a great way to evaluate a VPN service is to sign up for their free trial service and visit https://ipleak.net/, which will allow you to check whether your real IP address is actually being leaked. If it manages to track your physical location, you need to opt for a more reliable VPN service.

VPNs are now a vital component of cybersecurity, and if you need help selecting the right one for your business, consult with our security experts today. We also offer comprehensive cybersecurity services so no hacker or third party can get their hands on your data.
To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment
Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

Nearly 60 percent of small businesses have been the victims of a cyberattack over the past year, but the vast majority didn’t realize that they had been attacked, according to Nationwide’s third annual survey, released Monday.

The insurance company tapped 1,069 businesses with fewer than 299 employees for the study. Initially, only 13 percent of the participating companies said they had been victims of a cyberattack. However, after they were shown a list of cyberattack types — ranging from phishing scams to trojan horses to ransomware — that figure shot up to 58 percent.

“Cyberattacks are one of the greatest threats to the modern company,” said Mark Berven, Nationwide’s president of property and casualty. “Business owners are telling us that cybercriminals aren’t just attacking large companies on Wall Street.”

The companies that are targeted often have fewer cyberdefense systems, less money to invest in threat protection, and less name recognition at risk from a breach.
The most common forms of attack, based on the survey, were computer viruses, cited by 36 percent of respondents. Next came phishing attacks, cited by 29 percent, and then trojan horses, cited by 13 percent.

Lack of preparedness was a significant problem for the companies surveyed. About 57 percent of the firms did not have dedicated employee or vendor monitoring for cyberattacks in place. About 76 percent did not have a plan for dealing with such attacks. Fifty-seven percent did not have a plan for protecting employee data, and 54 percent lacked a plan for protecting customer data.

Recovery from cyberattacks in many cases was slow and expensive. About 20 percent of cyberattack victims spent US$50,000 and took more than six months to recover, while 7 percent spent more than $100,000 and took more than a year to recover.

Money Matters
Cyberattackers typically steal credit card information from companies with customers who make purchases from them, noted Karen Johnston, a technical consultant with Nationwide. They also steal personally identifiable information — such as addresses, names and Social Security numbers — that hackers can use to apply for new credit cards or loans, she told the E-Commerce Times.

Small businesses need to make sure their systems have proper antivirus and firewall protections, and make sure their systems are password-protected and properly patched and updated with the latest versions of antivirus and operating system software, Johnston said.

Companies also need to have up-to-date backups of their critical systems and customer data, and consider having cloud backups of this information, she suggested.

Further, most small businesses fail to have proper cyber-risk insurance, Johnston noted — or they think they are covered by existing business policies when they are not.

Protections Lacking
With their limited resources, small businesses tend to be more vulnerable to cyberattacks than larger enterprises.

“Small businesses are one of the most at-risk sectors of the market, in part because their data is equally valuable to an attacker and simultaneously their protections are significantly [less] than what you would see in a mid-size or enterprise business,” explained Kevin O’Brien, CEO of GreatHorn.

Cyberthieves are likely to sell whatever data they find on the Dark Web, and the price per item likely will be the same, whether the firm that was breached was a Fortune 500 or a much smaller firm, he told the E-Commerce Times.

The majority of attacks still arrive via email, but there recently has been a rapid increase in attacks via mobile devices and social media, observed Ryan Kalember, senior vice president of cybersecurity strategy at Proofpoint.

Technology firms and companies with complex supply chains, like manufacturers, are targeted more frequently, with about 40 email fraud attempts per organization, he told the E-Commerce Times.

“Small businesses can be a really sweet spot for cybercriminals. They have more money to steal than a consumer and less security in place than a large business,” said Kevin Haley, director of security response at Symantec.

“They are also often dependent on third-party vendors for their technology,” he told the E-Commerce Times. “Meanwhile, cybercriminals can be very successful specializing in breaching one technology or solution and working their way through the small businesses that use it.”

The field of cyber security is overwhelming — even for seasoned IT professionals. But not for us. We spend our days researching and experimenting to craft the best security solutions on the market. If you’re interested in one of our cutting-edge cyber-security plans, call us today.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment.

Published with consideration from TECHNEWSWORLD.com SOURCE

Contrary to popular belief, Macs do get hacked. Although it doesn’t happen as frequently as it does on Windows PCs, Macs have been infected by worms, Trojan horses, and other forms of malware in the past decade. Recently, security researchers discovered a new spyware that has flown under the radar for several years.

Fruitfly spyware
The spyware, known as Fruitfly, was first discovered in January 2017, but Synack chief security expert, Patrick Wardle, discovered a more cunning variant last month.

Along with being able to track the victims’ names and locations, the spyware reportedly gives the hacker control over webcams, mice, microphones, keyboards, and notifies hackers any time the computer is in use. This enables hackers to take non-consensual photos, capture screenshots, track keystrokes, and record audio.

What’s surprising is this type of spyware is not built for financial gain or designed to steal government secrets. It’s used to spy on regular people. According to experts, the hacker developed the spyware for voyeuristic reasons. Collecting private data from users also suggests that hackers planned to set up more targeted social engineering scams.

So far, there have been only 400 confirmed Fruitfly infections, but considering how it has remained hidden for nearly decade, that number could be much larger.

While experts are still not sure who created the malware and how it is delivered, it’s best to follow security best practices like avoiding pop-up ads, banners and suspicious file attachments, using extreme caution when downloading free software, and update applications frequently.

Users should also install anti-malware software with spyware detection capabilities and perform full system scans as often as possible. New security patches have been released to detect and block Fruitfly variants, so you should keep your security software up to date at all times, too.

Surge in Mac Malware
Windows PCs are targeted more frequently, but a recent threat intelligence report by McAfee found that the Mac malware incidents have grown by 53% over the first quarter of 2017.

Hackers will likely uncover new vulnerabilities in the future, which means Mac users can no longer afford to think that their device doesn’t need strong security software and support from managed services providers.

If you’re worried about the security of your Mac, talk to us today. We offer comprehensive solutions that can defend against the new Fruitfly strain and a host of other cyberattacks.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

Although ransomware has stolen the limelight recently, there’s another type of cyberattack targeting your bank account. Thanks to some horrifying ingenuity, being infected by OSX.Dok can result in victims directly handing their bank account information to hackers. Take a minute to find out how it works so you can avoid making a costly mistake.
OSX.Dok isn’t new, but it has been improved

Originally, this Mac-based malware looked very different. When OSX.Dok was first reported several months ago, it could infect only older versions of the Apple operating system. Besides being relegated to OS X, it didn’t do much more than simply spy on the internet history of its victims. More recently, however, OSX.Dok was updated to target the newer macOS and to steal banking information.
How does it work?

Like so many malware programs today, this particular threat is distributed via phishing emails. Because the end goal is to acquire private financial information, these emails pretend to have pressing information about taxes or bank statements stored in attachments that actually contain malicious software.

Once any of these attachments are opened, OSX.Dok secretly broadcasts information about the computer and its location to the malware’s authors. Based on that information, hackers can redirect victims that visit banking websites to copycat URLs tailored to their language and location. Almost everything on the copycat sites looks exactly the same, but when you submit your user ID and password, they go straight to hackers.

Worst of all, the latest version of this malware seems to be incredibly advanced. It actively changes the way it hides itself and even modifies system settings to keep the computer from checking for operating system and security updates.
What can I do?

Security experts are still working on a way to combat OSX.Dok, but believe that it will remain a problem for some time to come. For now there are a few things you can do:

Never open attachments from people you don’t know personally, and even then be wary of anything you weren’t expecting.

Pay attention to little details. For example, copyright dates at the bottom of fake banking sites only went to 2013.

Look closely at the lock to the left of URLs in your address bar. Fake websites may have security certificates with names slightly different from those of the sites they mimic.

The best way to stay ahead of threats like OSX.Dok is by partnering with a capable IT provider. That way you can be sure that you have all the latest software and hardware to keep you safe. Even if something managed to slip through, regular audits are sure to find infections sooner than an overburdened in-house team would. Call us today to find out how we can protect you!

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE

Most phishing attacks involve hiding malicious hyperlinks hidden behind enticing ad images or false-front URLs. Whatever the strategy is, phishing almost always relies on users clicking a link before checking where it really leads. But even the most cautious users may get caught up in the most recent scam. Take a look at our advice for how to avoid the newest trend in phishing.

What are homographs?

There are a lot of ways to disguise a hyperlink, but one strategy has survived for decades — and it’s enjoying a spike in popularity. Referred to as “homographs” by cybersecurity professionals, this phishing strategy revolves around how browsers interpret URLs written in other languages.

Take Russian for example, even though several Cyrillic letters look identical to English characters, computers see them as totally different. Browsers use basic translation tools to account for this so users can type in non-English URLs and arrive at legitimate websites. In practice, that means anyone can enter a 10-letter Cyrillic web address into their browser and the translation tools will convert that address into a series of English letters and numbers.

How does this lead to phishing attacks?

Malicious homographs utilize letters that look identical to their English counterparts to trick users into clicking on them. It’s an old trick, and most browsers have built-in fail-safes to prevent the issue. However, a security professional recently proved that the fail-safes in Chrome, Firefox, Opera and a few other less popular browsers can be easily tricked.

Without protection from your browser, there’s basically no way to know that you’re clicking on a Cyrillic URL. It looks like English, and no matter how skeptical you are, there’s no way to “ask” your browser what language it is. So you may think you’re clicking on apple.com, but you’re actually clicking on the Russian spelling of apple.com — which gets redirected to xn—80ak6aa92e.com. If that translated URL contains malware, you’re in trouble the second you click the link.

The solution

Avoiding any kind of cybersecurity attack begins with awareness, and when it comes to phishing, that means treating every link you want to click with skepticism. If you receive an email from someone you don’t know, or a suspicious message from someone you do, always check where it leads. Sometimes that’s as simple as hovering your mouse over hyperlink text to see what the address is, but when it comes to homographs that’s not enough.

In the case of homographs, the solution is unbelievably simple: Manually type in the web address. If you get an email from someone you haven’t heard from in 20 years that says “Have you checked out youtube.com??”, until your browser announces a fix, typing that URL into your browser’s address bar is the only way to be totally sure you’re safe.

For most, this trend feels like yet another development that justifies giving up on cybersecurity altogether. But for small- and medium-sized businesses that have outsourced their technology support and management to a competent and trustworthy IT provider, it’s just another reason to be thankful they decided against going it alone. If you’re ready to make the same decision, call us today.

What is phishing?
Email Phishing scams are carried out online by tech-savvy con artists and identity theft criminals. They use spam, fake websites constructed to look identical to real sites, email and instant messages to trick you into divulging sensitive information, like bank account passwords and credit card numbers. Once you take the phisher’s bait, they can use the information to create fake accounts in your name, ruin your credit, and steal your money or even your identity.
How do phishing scams find me?
This style of identity theft is extremely widespread because of the ease with which unsuspecting people share personal information. Phishing scams often lure you with spam email and instant messages requesting you to “verify your account” or “confirm your billing address” through what is actually a malicious Web site. Be very cautious. Phishers can only find you if you respond.
What can email phishing scams do to me?
After you’ve responded to a phishing scam, the attacker can:

  • Hijack your usernames and passwords
  • Steal your money and open credit card and bank accounts in your name
  • Request new account Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) or additional credit cards
  • Make purchases
  • Add themselves or an alias that they control as an authorized user so it’s easier to use your credit
  • Obtain cash advances
  • Use and abuse your Social Security number
  • Sell your information to other parties who will use it for illicit or illegal purposes

How will I know?
Phishers often pretend to be legitimate companies. Their messages may sound genuine and their sites can look remarkably like the real thing. It can be hard to tell the difference, but you may be dealing with a phishing scam if you see the following:

  • Requests for confidential information via email or instant message
  • Emotional language using scare tactics or urgent requests to respond
  • Misspelled URLs, spelling mistakes or the use of sub-domains
  • Links within the body of a message
  • Lack of a personal greeting or customized information within a message. Legitimate emails from banks and credit card companies will often include partial account numbers, user name or password.

How can I get phishing protection?
When you arm yourself with information and resources, you’re wiser about computer security threats and less vulnerable to phishing scam tactics. Take these steps to fortify your computer security and get better phishing protection right away:

  • Do not provide personal information to any unsolicited requests for information
  • Only provide personal information on sites that have “https” in the web address or have a lock icon at bottom of the browser
  • If you suspect you’ve received phishing bait, contact the company that is the subject of the email by phone to check that the message is legitimate
  • Type in a trusted URL for a company’s site into the address bar of your browser to bypass the link in a suspected phishing message
  • Use varied and complex passwords for all your accounts
  • Continually check the accuracy of personal accounts and deal with any discrepancies right away
  • Avoid questionable Web sites
  • Practice safe email protocol:
    • Don’t open messages from unknown senders
    • Immediately delete messages you suspect to be spam

Make sure that you have the best security software products installed on your PC for better phishing protection:
Use antivirus protection and a firewall
Get antispyware software protection
An unprotected computer is like an open door for email phishing scams. For a more potent form of protection, use a spam filter or gateway to scan inbound messages. Products like Webroot Spy Sweeper® and Webroot Internet Security Essentials thwart dangerous malware before it can enter your PC, stand guard at every possible entrance of your computer and fend off any spyware or viruses that try to enter, even the most damaging and devious strains. While free anti-spyware and antivirus downloads are available, they just can’t keep up with the continuous onslaught of new spyware strains. Previously undetected forms of spyware can often do the most damage, so it’s critical to have up-to-the-minute, guaranteed protection.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment.

Published with consideration from Webroot SOURCE

 

As technology consultants, we’re stuck between a rock and a hard place. We want to provide our clients with enterprise-level IT, but that requires that we specialize in overwhelmingly intricate technology. Explaining even the most foundational aspects of our cyber-security would most likely put you to sleep before convincing you of our expertise. But if you really want to know, here are a few summaries of how we focus on proactive strategies rather than reactive ones.

Understand the threats you’re facing
Before any small- or medium-sized business can work toward preventing cyber-attacks, everyone involved needs to know exactly what they’re fighting against. Whether you’re working with in-house IT staff or an outsourced provider, you should review what types of attack vectors are most common in your industry. Ideally, your team would do this a few times a year.

Reevaluate what it is you’re protecting
Now that you have a list of the biggest threats to your organization, you need to take stock of how each one threatens the various cogs of your network. Map out every device that connects to the internet, what services are currently protecting those devices, and what type of data they have access to (regulated, mission-critical, low-importance, etc.).

Create a baseline of protection
By reviewing current trends in the cyber-security field, alongside an audit of your current technology framework, you can begin to get a clearer picture of how you want to prioritize your preventative measure versus your reactive measures.

Before you can start improving your cyber-security approach, you need to know where the baseline is. Create a handful of real-life scenarios and simulate them on your network. Network penetration testing from trustworthy IT professionals will help pinpoint strengths and weaknesses in your current framework.

Finalize a plan
All these pieces will complete the puzzle of what your new strategies need to be. With an experienced technology consultant onboard for the entire process, you can easily parse the results of your simulation into a multi-pronged approach to becoming more proactive:

  • Security awareness seminars that coach everyone — from receptionists to CEOs — about password management and mobile device usage.
  • “Front-line” defenses like intrusion prevention systems and hardware firewalls that scrutinize everything trying to sneak its way in through the front door or your network.
  • Routine checkups for software updates, licenses, and patches to minimize the chance of leaving a backdoor to your network open.
  • Web-filtering services that blacklist dangerous and inappropriate sites for anyone on your network.
  • Antivirus software that specializes in the threats most common to your industry.

 

As soon as you focus on preventing downtime events instead of reacting to them, your technology will begin to increase your productivity and efficiency to levels you’ve never dreamed of. Start enhancing your cyber-security by giving us a call for a demonstration.

The field of cyber security is overwhelming — even for seasoned IT professionals. But not for us. We spend our days researching and experimenting to craft the best security solutions on the market. If you’re interested in one of our cutting-edge cyber-security plans, call us today.

To learn more about how to safeguard your business, or if you are looking for an expert to help you find the best solutions for your business talk to GCInfotech about a free technology assessment.

Published with consideration from TechAdvisory.org SOURCE